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26 Research products, page 1 of 3

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Schneider, Luisa;
    Publisher: Culture in Quarantine
    Country: Netherlands

    ImagineThe internet stops workingelectricity is cutthe many screens which connect you to the world turn blackyou no longer have access to your bank accountor functioning credits cardsthe walls behind which you retreated fade awayand you find yourself under the open skynow you are like menothing but a “dangerous body” on the streetwhat can you do now?what must you do now?out in the open where an invisible virus lurks?you roamroam the city forfoodinformationand means to protect those you love

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davies, Gareth;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van der Veen, Chiel; Smits, Mireille; van der Wilt, Femke; Wynberg, Elizabeth;
    Publisher: Child & Family Blog
    Country: Netherlands
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Chapman, Chris; Ehren, Melanie; Montecinos, Carmen; Weakley, Sarah;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mattijssen, Lucille; van Doorn, Tess; van Vliet, Nicolien; Kanbier, Nadine;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cong, Yingying; Verlhac, Pauline; Reggiori, Fulvio;
    Project: SNSF | ER-phagy mechanisms to ma... (154421), NWO | A three-dimensional look ... (2300175771), EC | PRONKJEWAIL (713660)

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular catabolic pathway that allows cells to maintain homeostasis through the degradation of deleterious components via specialized double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. During the past decades, it has been revealed that numerous pathogens, including viruses, usurp autophagy in order to promote their propagation. Nidovirales are an order of enveloped viruses with large single-stranded positive RNA genomes. Four virus families (Arterividae, Coronaviridae, Mesoniviridae, and Roniviridae) are part of this order, which comprises several human and animal pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. In host cells, Nidovirales induce membrane rearrangements including autophagosome formation. The relevance and putative mechanism of autophagy usurpation, however, remain largely elusive. Here, we review the current knowledge about the possible interplay between Nidovirales and autophagy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Wagner, Wolfgang; Onderco, Michal;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ben-Menahem, Shiko; Erden, Zeynep;
    Publisher: California Management Review Insights
    Country: Netherlands
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Crum, Ben;
    Publisher: RECONNECT project
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | RECONNECT (770142)
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Holle, Fabian;
    Country: Netherlands

    Fabian Holle, is conducting research on the role of art practices in the lives of 10 LGBTQ+ artists with a forced migration background. Fabian Holle initiated this research project as a master student (supported by PhD researcher Maria Rast) and is now continuing it as a PhD candidate. Due to COVID-19 (and measures taken to contain it), these artists are dealing with uncertainties, anxieties and separation from their communities and loved ones. Additionally, seeing that most artistic assignments and events have been cancelled, some experience a loss of income. Through Art for Change, we try to find a way (and learn more about how) to show solidarity through engaged scholarship in times of a pandemic. We began by connecting with these artists (online), engaging in conversations and interviews, and inviting them to develop remunerated artistic works (using creative writing, music, graphic design and film) about (their) experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic.Through processes of (knowledge) co-creation, collaboration, and curation, we documented stories of these artists’ challenges and resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking into consideration that arts-based research methods bear the potential of creating a novel space for alternative narratives, critical voices, emotions, hope, and creative ideas, our aim was also to establish a space for stories that challenge and unsettle dominant negative images of refugees.