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  • Authors: König, Ronny; Seifert, Alexander;

    Digital skills can be a valuable resource in work life, especially in such times as the current COVID-19 pandemic, during which working from home has become new reality. Although increasing numbers of older employees (aged 50 years and above) are using digital technologies to work remotely, many of these older adults still have generally lower digital skills. Whether the pandemic will be a push factor for the acquisition of computer skills in late working life remains unclear. This study investigated the explanatory factors of the computer skills gained by older workers who were working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, using representative data for 28 countries from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). The analysis of the survey responses of 11,042 employed persons aged 50 years and older revealed that, 13% worked only at home due to the pandemic, while 15% said they worked at home and in their usual workplace. The descriptives indicate that full-time homeworking is more of an option among those with tertiary education and who already have some computer skills. Of the older employees who worked only at home, 36% reported an improvement in their computer skills, whereas of the older workers who worked at home and at their usual workplaces, only 29% reported such an improvement. Our results based on logistic regressions suggest that significantly more women, younger employees, respondents with tertiary educational qualifications, and those whose work was not affected by unemployment or even business closure acquired new computer skills, regardless of whether they were working permanently or only partly from home. The study underlines the importance of investigating the possible digital skills gained from the home office situation resulting from the pandemic.

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Erickson, Jacob; Lyons, Donna; Grile, Courtney Helen; Devitt, Ann; +6 Authors

    PUBLISHED Artwork: Rita Duffy Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin In the spring of 2020, when the pandemic hit our shores, we were told to stay home. We listened to public health advice and to experts debating the measures required to protect us. Scientific terminology crept into our daily conversations. But in addition to the ongoing uncertainty about the long-term impacts of the virus on our health, many of us were struggling with the uncertainty that now emerged in our everyday lives. What did the pandemic mean to us, beyond its medical impact, in a cultural and social sense? To consider this question, the Trinity Long Room Hub launched a Covid-19 blog series, in which contributors reflected on how we might cope with the loss of physical contact and human connection (Courtney Helen Grile, p.16) and how we could feel both ?urgency and fatigue? (Jacob Erikson, p.8). We heard from author Caitr?ona Lally on how our understanding of ?essential work? changes at a time like this (p.5), and Sam Slote talked us through Ulysses as a guide for navigating the pandemic as we celebrated ?Zoomsday? (p.23). Lorraine Leeson highlighted what it means to be deaf during a global health crisis, (p.45) and Eve Patten drew on post-war literature to reflect on what might come next: ?A Tale of ?Afterwards?? ( p.53). In these and other blogs from the series, we looked to language and literature, to art and creative practice, and to many other humanities disciplines in search of precedent and perspective on what the pandemic means for us as humans. We are pleased to be able to share these blogs with you in this shortened collection. Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Trinity's Access to ...arrow_drop_down
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Trinity's Access to ...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
  • Authors: König, Ronny; Seifert, Alexander;

    Digital skills can be a valuable resource in work life, especially in such times as the current COVID-19 pandemic, during which working from home has become new reality. Although increasing numbers of older employees (aged 50 years and above) are using digital technologies to work remotely, many of these older adults still have generally lower digital skills. Whether the pandemic will be a push factor for the acquisition of computer skills in late working life remains unclear. This study investigated the explanatory factors of the computer skills gained by older workers who were working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, using representative data for 28 countries from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). The analysis of the survey responses of 11,042 employed persons aged 50 years and older revealed that, 13% worked only at home due to the pandemic, while 15% said they worked at home and in their usual workplace. The descriptives indicate that full-time homeworking is more of an option among those with tertiary education and who already have some computer skills. Of the older employees who worked only at home, 36% reported an improvement in their computer skills, whereas of the older workers who worked at home and at their usual workplaces, only 29% reported such an improvement. Our results based on logistic regressions suggest that significantly more women, younger employees, respondents with tertiary educational qualifications, and those whose work was not affected by unemployment or even business closure acquired new computer skills, regardless of whether they were working permanently or only partly from home. The study underlines the importance of investigating the possible digital skills gained from the home office situation resulting from the pandemic.

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Erickson, Jacob; Lyons, Donna; Grile, Courtney Helen; Devitt, Ann; +6 Authors

    PUBLISHED Artwork: Rita Duffy Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin In the spring of 2020, when the pandemic hit our shores, we were told to stay home. We listened to public health advice and to experts debating the measures required to protect us. Scientific terminology crept into our daily conversations. But in addition to the ongoing uncertainty about the long-term impacts of the virus on our health, many of us were struggling with the uncertainty that now emerged in our everyday lives. What did the pandemic mean to us, beyond its medical impact, in a cultural and social sense? To consider this question, the Trinity Long Room Hub launched a Covid-19 blog series, in which contributors reflected on how we might cope with the loss of physical contact and human connection (Courtney Helen Grile, p.16) and how we could feel both ?urgency and fatigue? (Jacob Erikson, p.8). We heard from author Caitr?ona Lally on how our understanding of ?essential work? changes at a time like this (p.5), and Sam Slote talked us through Ulysses as a guide for navigating the pandemic as we celebrated ?Zoomsday? (p.23). Lorraine Leeson highlighted what it means to be deaf during a global health crisis, (p.45) and Eve Patten drew on post-war literature to reflect on what might come next: ?A Tale of ?Afterwards?? ( p.53). In these and other blogs from the series, we looked to language and literature, to art and creative practice, and to many other humanities disciplines in search of precedent and perspective on what the pandemic means for us as humans. We are pleased to be able to share these blogs with you in this shortened collection. Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Trinity's Access to ...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Trinity's Access to ...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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