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1,671 Research products, page 1 of 168

  • COVID-19
  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • English

10
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gamze Özbek Güven; Cumhur Artuk;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Healthcare professionals experience difficult processes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected the whole world in a short time. They are especially likely to be exposed to the disease agent due to their close contact with people affected by the virus. For this reason, it is important for healthcare professionals to choose and use of PPE correctly before approaching the patient, and pay attention to hand hygiene and social distance. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the application developed for the use of PPE.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Willems, Lucia D.; Dyzel, Vernandi; Sterkenburg, P.S.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: A worldwide vaccination program is the chosen strategy against the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccine hesitancy however, forms a threat because vaccine uptake is voluntary in most countries. Care-professionals of people with intellectual disabilities are exposed to greater risks than other healthcare workers due to the vulnerable group they attend to and the assisted-living facilities in which they often work. Little is still known of the reasons for vaccine hesitancy in this specific group in contrast to those of other healthcare workers. Objective: To provide insight in the intentions and attitudes on COVID-vaccination of healthcare workers, including those who care for people with intellectual disabilities, by means of a scoping review. Methods: The databases that were searched for papers are CINAHL, APA PsycArticles, APA PsycInfo, Web of Science, Semantic Scolar, Prospero, Outbreak Science, Cochrane and Scopus. The search was broadened to healthcare workers in general because only two papers were found on those caring for people with intellectual disabilities. A total of 26 papers were identified concerning the vaccine intentions of 43,199 healthcare workers worldwide. Data were gathered both quantitively and qualitatively. The papers were analysed for all themes regarding vaccine willingness and vaccine hesitancy. Results: The themes that came to light included: percentages of vaccine willingness, predictors of willingness differentiated by 11 sub-themes (mainly profession, age, gender and past vaccine behaviour), attitudes of willingness and hesitancy differentiated by 19 sub-themes (perceived COVID treat and protecting others for willingness, concerns on vaccine safety and efficacy for hesitancy), sources of vaccination information, contextual factors and changes in COVID-19 vaccine acceptance over time and finally, future strategies for interventions. Conclusions: There was overlap in the percentages of vaccination, predictors of vaccine willingness and the attitudes of vaccine willingness and hesitancy between healthcare workers and those caring for people with intellectual disabilities. Vaccine safety and efficacy are the most prominent concerns with regard to vaccine hesitancy. Therefore, future strategies for interventions should address vaccine safety and efficacy. Furthermore, interventions are recommended to be interactive in order to facilitate exchange. Discussion groups that are able to address specific concerns and personal experiences, show to be effective in addressing vaccine hesitancy. Accurate information can also be made more accessible to target groups by promoting video’s on social media platforms. Hence, further research is necessary to specify more precisely the attitudes of healthcare workers caring for people with intellectual disabilities and in more countries worldwide.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Serkan Sayıner; Ahmet Özer Şehirli;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Although the types of coronaviruses seen in animals differ, recent studies have also shown that they are affected by COVID-19, known as SARS-CoV-2. The impact of COVID-19 on animals is a factor that should be followed carefully, especially since different variants appear in humans every day and this disease is transmitted from human to animal. Thanks to vaccination, animals are less affected by different types of coronaviruses. Cats and ferrets are especially affected much more in COVID-19, causing damage to the lungs and other organs. Recently, it has been shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies, especially in the early stages of COVID-19, by people with chronic diseases, positively affects the course of the disease, reduces the frequency of hospitalization and the possibility of falling into intensive care. Sotrovimab is a pan-sarbecovirus monoclonal antibody, and 12-13 studies to date have shown that individuals with chronic disease are less affected when given in the early stages of the disease when the symptoms are mild. We also think that if especially old cats and ferrets are treated with Sotrovimab in the early stages of the disease when they contract COVID-19, it will positively affect the prognosis of the disease.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hernández de Cos, Pablo;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    El gobernador interviene en la discusión del Proyecto de Presupuestos Generales del Estado para 2022, que da soporte a las consideraciones de la política fiscal ante la recuperación gradual de la economía española y mundial tras la profunda crisis económica provocada por la pandemia de COVID-19. Inicia sus comparecencias ante la Comisión de Presupuestos del Congreso de los Diputados con un análisis de la evolución de la economía española y de las perspectivas macroeconómicas, y pasa a detallar los desarrollos nacionales e internacionales más recientes y las fuentes de incertidumbre que van a condicionar el avance de la actividad en los próximos años. En ese marco sitúa su visión del papel de las políticas económicas. En relación con el Proyecto de Presupuestos Generales del Estado, ofrece su valoración sobre el cuadro macroeconómico que incorpora la evolución de los ingresos y gastos públicos, el tono resultante de la política fiscal y la dinámica de la deuda pública. Asimismo plantea los principales retos para la política fiscal española a medio y a largo plazo, que se estructuran en torno a dos ejes estrechamente vinculados: reforzar la sostenibilidad de las finanzas públicas y mejorar la calidad de las cuentas públicas. Para finalizar, dedica unas breves reflexiones a la reforma del Pacto de Estabilidad y Crecimiento. En la comparecencia ante la Comisión de Presupuestos del Senado, el gobernador actualiza la información sobre la situación económica con los datos disponibles más recientes y realiza un análisis más detallado de la evolución de la inflación en el período reciente, sus causas y su potencial persistencia, así como de su impacto sobre la política monetaria del Banco Central Europeo. The Governor’s testimony is part of the discussion of the Draft State Budget for 2022. The Budget underpins the fiscal policy considerations ahead of a gradual recovery in the Spanish and global economy, following the deep-seated economic crisis prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic. His testimony before the Congress of Deputies Budget Committee begins with an analysis of developments in the Spanish economy and the macroeconomic outlook. He sets out the latest national and international developments, along with the sources of uncertainty set to influence how economic activity evolves in the coming years. Against this background, he frames his view of the role of economic policies. In connection with the Draft State Budget, he offers his assessment of the attendant macroeconomic forecast, government receipts and spending, the resulting fiscal policy stance and public debt dynamics. He further considers the main challenges for Spanish fiscal policy in the medium and long term, which are structured around two closely linked axes: shoring up the sustainability and improving the quality of public finances. He concludes with some brief thoughts on the reform of the Stability and Growth Pact. In his testimony before the Senate Budget Committee, the Governor updates the information on the economic situation according to the latest information available and analyses in greater detail the latest inflation developments, their causes and how long they may last, and their impact on the European Central Bank’s monetary policy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McCrone, John T; Hill, Verity; Bajaj, Sumali; Pena, Rosario Evans; Lambert, Ben C; Inward, Rhys; Bhatt, Samir; Volz, Erik; Ruis, Christopher; Dellicour, Simon; +31 more
    Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, BMJ and Yale University
    Country: Belgium

    The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases 1-3 . The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions 4,5 . Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations; however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta's invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron. ispartof: medRxiv ispartof: medRxiv ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pittonet, Sara; Meneses, Rita; Muradore Gallas, Serenella; Cepinskas, Linas; L'Hours, Herve; von Stein, Ilona; Davidson, Joy; Newbold, Elizabeth; Kayumbi-Kabeya, Gabin; Garbuglia, Federica; +1 more
    Country: Netherlands

    The Charter of the EOSC Task Force on Researcher Engagement and Adoption, set-up in September 2021, states that “The overarching principle for developing EOSC is that research has to be at the core of the EOSC initiative. Thus, deep engagement with research communities is fundamental in order to understand their needs and requirements and ensure that the way in which EOSC operates and the existing and future community services are of use and value to researchers and respect the academic sovereignty of scientific results, research data and digital objects”. Over the last 36 months, FAIRsFAIR has provided practical solutions for the implementation of FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle. This has been achieved by fostering FAIR data culture and the uptake of good practices in making data FAIR. The FAIRsFAIR project addressed the development and concrete realisation of academic quality data management, procedures, standards, metrics and related matters, based on the FAIR principles. The engagement of European stakeholders was fundamental across all the activities. To that end, a mix of channels was used with the ultimate aim to ensure active participation and an overall feeling of being part of an enlarged community. For example, a bottom-up approach was established wherever possible and relevant; adaptation and flexibility ensured that the best engagement channels were used to reach each target community. It is important to highlight how the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting decision to organise workshops as online events had a positive impact on allowing interested participants in several activities to be reached. In particular, the switch to online events was instrumental in involving professionals from universities and other higher education institutions, who usually experience a different set of capacity and budgetary challenges, in attending physical events held outside or far from their countries. But this was also true for other events including the Synchronisation Force series, the national roadshows and the data steward instructor training. The participation of different stakeholders in the online workshops greatly enriched the discussions and contributed to shift the focus from Europe-centric issues involving FAIR research data with international insights and experiences. In order to present the impact achieved, this document presents the activities performed and analyses the related results around the FAIRsFAIR main stakeholders.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kraemer, Moritz; McCrone, John; Hill, Verity; Bajaj, Sumali; Evans-Pena, Rosario; Lambert, Ben; Inward, Rhys; Bhatt, Samir; Volz, Erik; Ruis, Christopher; +30 more
    Publisher: Research Square Company
    Country: Belgium

    The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases. The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations; however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta’s invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron. ispartof: Research Square ispartof: Research Square ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nabbe, Marie; Brand, Helmut;
    Country: Netherlands

    The COVID-19 pandemic brought visibility and intensified the discussions on the European Union's (EU) health mandate. The proposals of the European Commission (EC) to move towards a European Health Union (EHU) can be seen as a starting point towards more integration in health. However, the definition of what the EHU will look like is not clear. This paper searches to find a common definition, and/or features for this EHU through a systematic literature review performed in May 2021. "European Union's concern about health for all" is suggested as a definition. The main drivers identified to develop an EHU are: surveillance and monitoring, crisis preparedness, funding, political will, vision of public health expenditures, population's awareness and interest, and global health. Based on these findings, five scenarios were developed: making a full move towards supranational action; improving efficiency in the actual framework; more coordination but no real change; in a full intergovernmentalism direction; and fragmentation of the EU. The scenarios show that the development of a EHU is possible inside the current legal framework. However, it will rely on increased coordination and has a focus on cross-border health threats. Any development will be strongly linked to political choices from Member States.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaied, J.; Skinner, J.; Winterbottom, C.; Brook MO, M. O.; Thornley, A.; Turner, C.; Newell, D.; Lasserson, Daniel; Bottomley, M. J.;
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,671 Research products, page 1 of 168
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gamze Özbek Güven; Cumhur Artuk;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Healthcare professionals experience difficult processes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected the whole world in a short time. They are especially likely to be exposed to the disease agent due to their close contact with people affected by the virus. For this reason, it is important for healthcare professionals to choose and use of PPE correctly before approaching the patient, and pay attention to hand hygiene and social distance. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the application developed for the use of PPE.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Willems, Lucia D.; Dyzel, Vernandi; Sterkenburg, P.S.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: A worldwide vaccination program is the chosen strategy against the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccine hesitancy however, forms a threat because vaccine uptake is voluntary in most countries. Care-professionals of people with intellectual disabilities are exposed to greater risks than other healthcare workers due to the vulnerable group they attend to and the assisted-living facilities in which they often work. Little is still known of the reasons for vaccine hesitancy in this specific group in contrast to those of other healthcare workers. Objective: To provide insight in the intentions and attitudes on COVID-vaccination of healthcare workers, including those who care for people with intellectual disabilities, by means of a scoping review. Methods: The databases that were searched for papers are CINAHL, APA PsycArticles, APA PsycInfo, Web of Science, Semantic Scolar, Prospero, Outbreak Science, Cochrane and Scopus. The search was broadened to healthcare workers in general because only two papers were found on those caring for people with intellectual disabilities. A total of 26 papers were identified concerning the vaccine intentions of 43,199 healthcare workers worldwide. Data were gathered both quantitively and qualitatively. The papers were analysed for all themes regarding vaccine willingness and vaccine hesitancy. Results: The themes that came to light included: percentages of vaccine willingness, predictors of willingness differentiated by 11 sub-themes (mainly profession, age, gender and past vaccine behaviour), attitudes of willingness and hesitancy differentiated by 19 sub-themes (perceived COVID treat and protecting others for willingness, concerns on vaccine safety and efficacy for hesitancy), sources of vaccination information, contextual factors and changes in COVID-19 vaccine acceptance over time and finally, future strategies for interventions. Conclusions: There was overlap in the percentages of vaccination, predictors of vaccine willingness and the attitudes of vaccine willingness and hesitancy between healthcare workers and those caring for people with intellectual disabilities. Vaccine safety and efficacy are the most prominent concerns with regard to vaccine hesitancy. Therefore, future strategies for interventions should address vaccine safety and efficacy. Furthermore, interventions are recommended to be interactive in order to facilitate exchange. Discussion groups that are able to address specific concerns and personal experiences, show to be effective in addressing vaccine hesitancy. Accurate information can also be made more accessible to target groups by promoting video’s on social media platforms. Hence, further research is necessary to specify more precisely the attitudes of healthcare workers caring for people with intellectual disabilities and in more countries worldwide.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Serkan Sayıner; Ahmet Özer Şehirli;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Although the types of coronaviruses seen in animals differ, recent studies have also shown that they are affected by COVID-19, known as SARS-CoV-2. The impact of COVID-19 on animals is a factor that should be followed carefully, especially since different variants appear in humans every day and this disease is transmitted from human to animal. Thanks to vaccination, animals are less affected by different types of coronaviruses. Cats and ferrets are especially affected much more in COVID-19, causing damage to the lungs and other organs. Recently, it has been shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies, especially in the early stages of COVID-19, by people with chronic diseases, positively affects the course of the disease, reduces the frequency of hospitalization and the possibility of falling into intensive care. Sotrovimab is a pan-sarbecovirus monoclonal antibody, and 12-13 studies to date have shown that individuals with chronic disease are less affected when given in the early stages of the disease when the symptoms are mild. We also think that if especially old cats and ferrets are treated with Sotrovimab in the early stages of the disease when they contract COVID-19, it will positively affect the prognosis of the disease.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hernández de Cos, Pablo;
    Publisher: Banco de España
    Country: Spain

    El gobernador interviene en la discusión del Proyecto de Presupuestos Generales del Estado para 2022, que da soporte a las consideraciones de la política fiscal ante la recuperación gradual de la economía española y mundial tras la profunda crisis económica provocada por la pandemia de COVID-19. Inicia sus comparecencias ante la Comisión de Presupuestos del Congreso de los Diputados con un análisis de la evolución de la economía española y de las perspectivas macroeconómicas, y pasa a detallar los desarrollos nacionales e internacionales más recientes y las fuentes de incertidumbre que van a condicionar el avance de la actividad en los próximos años. En ese marco sitúa su visión del papel de las políticas económicas. En relación con el Proyecto de Presupuestos Generales del Estado, ofrece su valoración sobre el cuadro macroeconómico que incorpora la evolución de los ingresos y gastos públicos, el tono resultante de la política fiscal y la dinámica de la deuda pública. Asimismo plantea los principales retos para la política fiscal española a medio y a largo plazo, que se estructuran en torno a dos ejes estrechamente vinculados: reforzar la sostenibilidad de las finanzas públicas y mejorar la calidad de las cuentas públicas. Para finalizar, dedica unas breves reflexiones a la reforma del Pacto de Estabilidad y Crecimiento. En la comparecencia ante la Comisión de Presupuestos del Senado, el gobernador actualiza la información sobre la situación económica con los datos disponibles más recientes y realiza un análisis más detallado de la evolución de la inflación en el período reciente, sus causas y su potencial persistencia, así como de su impacto sobre la política monetaria del Banco Central Europeo. The Governor’s testimony is part of the discussion of the Draft State Budget for 2022. The Budget underpins the fiscal policy considerations ahead of a gradual recovery in the Spanish and global economy, following the deep-seated economic crisis prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic. His testimony before the Congress of Deputies Budget Committee begins with an analysis of developments in the Spanish economy and the macroeconomic outlook. He sets out the latest national and international developments, along with the sources of uncertainty set to influence how economic activity evolves in the coming years. Against this background, he frames his view of the role of economic policies. In connection with the Draft State Budget, he offers his assessment of the attendant macroeconomic forecast, government receipts and spending, the resulting fiscal policy stance and public debt dynamics. He further considers the main challenges for Spanish fiscal policy in the medium and long term, which are structured around two closely linked axes: shoring up the sustainability and improving the quality of public finances. He concludes with some brief thoughts on the reform of the Stability and Growth Pact. In his testimony before the Senate Budget Committee, the Governor updates the information on the economic situation according to the latest information available and analyses in greater detail the latest inflation developments, their causes and how long they may last, and their impact on the European Central Bank’s monetary policy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McCrone, John T; Hill, Verity; Bajaj, Sumali; Pena, Rosario Evans; Lambert, Ben C; Inward, Rhys; Bhatt, Samir; Volz, Erik; Ruis, Christopher; Dellicour, Simon; +31 more
    Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, BMJ and Yale University
    Country: Belgium

    The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases 1-3 . The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions 4,5 . Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations; however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta's invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron. ispartof: medRxiv ispartof: medRxiv ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pittonet, Sara; Meneses, Rita; Muradore Gallas, Serenella; Cepinskas, Linas; L'Hours, Herve; von Stein, Ilona; Davidson, Joy; Newbold, Elizabeth; Kayumbi-Kabeya, Gabin; Garbuglia, Federica; +1 more
    Country: Netherlands

    The Charter of the EOSC Task Force on Researcher Engagement and Adoption, set-up in September 2021, states that “The overarching principle for developing EOSC is that research has to be at the core of the EOSC initiative. Thus, deep engagement with research communities is fundamental in order to understand their needs and requirements and ensure that the way in which EOSC operates and the existing and future community services are of use and value to researchers and respect the academic sovereignty of scientific results, research data and digital objects”. Over the last 36 months, FAIRsFAIR has provided practical solutions for the implementation of FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle. This has been achieved by fostering FAIR data culture and the uptake of good practices in making data FAIR. The FAIRsFAIR project addressed the development and concrete realisation of academic quality data management, procedures, standards, metrics and related matters, based on the FAIR principles. The engagement of European stakeholders was fundamental across all the activities. To that end, a mix of channels was used with the ultimate aim to ensure active participation and an overall feeling of being part of an enlarged community. For example, a bottom-up approach was established wherever possible and relevant; adaptation and flexibility ensured that the best engagement channels were used to reach each target community. It is important to highlight how the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting decision to organise workshops as online events had a positive impact on allowing interested participants in several activities to be reached. In particular, the switch to online events was instrumental in involving professionals from universities and other higher education institutions, who usually experience a different set of capacity and budgetary challenges, in attending physical events held outside or far from their countries. But this was also true for other events including the Synchronisation Force series, the national roadshows and the data steward instructor training. The participation of different stakeholders in the online workshops greatly enriched the discussions and contributed to shift the focus from Europe-centric issues involving FAIR research data with international insights and experiences. In order to present the impact achieved, this document presents the activities performed and analyses the related results around the FAIRsFAIR main stakeholders.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kraemer, Moritz; McCrone, John; Hill, Verity; Bajaj, Sumali; Evans-Pena, Rosario; Lambert, Ben; Inward, Rhys; Bhatt, Samir; Volz, Erik; Ruis, Christopher; +30 more
    Publisher: Research Square Company
    Country: Belgium

    The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases. The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations; however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta’s invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron. ispartof: Research Square ispartof: Research Square ispartof: location:United States status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nabbe, Marie; Brand, Helmut;
    Country: Netherlands

    The COVID-19 pandemic brought visibility and intensified the discussions on the European Union's (EU) health mandate. The proposals of the European Commission (EC) to move towards a European Health Union (EHU) can be seen as a starting point towards more integration in health. However, the definition of what the EHU will look like is not clear. This paper searches to find a common definition, and/or features for this EHU through a systematic literature review performed in May 2021. "European Union's concern about health for all" is suggested as a definition. The main drivers identified to develop an EHU are: surveillance and monitoring, crisis preparedness, funding, political will, vision of public health expenditures, population's awareness and interest, and global health. Based on these findings, five scenarios were developed: making a full move towards supranational action; improving efficiency in the actual framework; more coordination but no real change; in a full intergovernmentalism direction; and fragmentation of the EU. The scenarios show that the development of a EHU is possible inside the current legal framework. However, it will rely on increased coordination and has a focus on cross-border health threats. Any development will be strongly linked to political choices from Member States.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaied, J.; Skinner, J.; Winterbottom, C.; Brook MO, M. O.; Thornley, A.; Turner, C.; Newell, D.; Lasserson, Daniel; Bottomley, M. J.;
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom