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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
194 Research products, page 1 of 20

  • COVID-19
  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • GB
  • DK
  • English

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaied, J.; Skinner, J.; Winterbottom, C.; Brook MO, M. O.; Thornley, A.; Turner, C.; Newell, D.; Lasserson, Daniel; Bottomley, M. J.;
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pattaro, Serena;
    Publisher: Scottish Centre for Administrative Data Research
    Country: United Kingdom

    There are occupational disparities in the risk of COVID-19. In this Data Insights, we explore how COVID-19 mortality rates vary by occupation for women and men in Scotland in the period between 1st March 2020 and 31st January 2021. Using a national novel linked data collection, we contrast preliminary results for Scotland with those from a similar linked data study for England.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, A; Bou-Antoun, S; Guy, R; Brown, CS; Hopkins, S; Gerver, S;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background Antibacterial prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) accounts for almost half of all prescribing in primary care. Nearly a quarter of antibacterial prescribing in primary care is estimated to be inappropriate, the greatest being for RTIs. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the provision of healthcare services and impacted the levels of antibacterials prescribed. Objectives To describe the changes in community antibacterial prescribing for RTIs in winter 2020–21 in England. Methods RTI antibacterial prescribing was measured in prescription items/1000 population for primary care from January 2014 and in DDDs/1000 population/day for the totality of RTI prescribing [combined with Accident & Emergency (A&E) in secondary care], from January 2016 to February 2021. Trends were assessed using negative binomial regression and seasonally adjusted interrupted time-series analysis. Results Antibacterials prescribed for RTIs reduced by a further 12.4% per season compared with pre-COVID (P < 0.001). In winter 2020–21, RTI prescriptions almost halved compared with the previous winter in 2019–20 (P < 0.001). The trend observed for total RTI prescribing (primary care with A&E) was similar to that observed in the community alone. Conclusions During COVID-19, RTI prescribing reduced in the community and the expected rise in winter was not seen in 2020–21. We found no evidence that RTI prescribing shifted from primary care to A&E in secondary care. The most likely explanation is a decrease in RTIs and presentations to primary care associated with national prevention measures for COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galvin, Emer; Desselle, Shane; Gavin, Blánaid; Quigley, Etain; Flear, Mark; Kilbride, Ken; McNicholas, Fiona; Cullinan, Shane; Hayden, John;
    Publisher: HRB
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic response has led to an exponential increase in the use and spread of telemedicine internationally. In community mental health care settings, telemedicine services were implemented within a few weeks, with little time for rigorous planning. Despite the reported acceptability of telemedicine by patients and clinicians, barriers to its implementation have come to light. There is now a need to investigate these barriers, and facilitators, as telemedicine begins to show potential promise beyond the pandemic. We propose a review that aims to identify the factors affecting the implementation of telemedicine consultations for patients with mental health conditions in the community.Methods: A systematic review will be conducted and reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Five electronic databases will be searched using a pre-defined search strategy from 2016 to 2021. Only studies of synchronous, interactive telemedicine consultations conducted via video, phone or live messaging between patients and providers will be included. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies will be eligible for inclusion. Only studies published in the English language will be included. Titles and abstracts will be screened by two reviewers. Full text articles will be screened by a single reviewer, with a random 20% sample screened by a second reviewer. The methodological quality of studies will be assessed using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT) by two reviewers. Data will be extracted and tabulated to address the aims of the review. A narrative synthesis will be conducted and reported factors will be mapped to the domains of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR).Conclusion: By identifying the factors that influence the implementation of telemedicine consultations for patients with mental conditions in the community, consideration can be given to both barriers and facilitators that could be addressed in future mental health services planning.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Connock, A;
    Publisher: Bite-Sized Books
    Country: United Kingdom

    In Spring 2020, a large percentage of the UK population believed outlandish Covid19 conspiracies. Social media disinformation was powerful, and mainstream countering strategies insufficiently targeted social channels. But commercial sanctions on platforms could prove the winning strategy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Blackburn, Robert; Machin, Stephen; Ventura, Maria;
    Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics
    Country: United Kingdom

    The fourth LSE-CEP survey of self-employment was undertaken in September 2021, following the previous three of May 2020, September 2020 and February 2021. • The economic fortunes of self-employed workers have been hit hard throughout the pandemic. They have seen some improvement since January 2021, although incomes and profits are still notably some way below pre-crisis levels. • Just below 30 per cent of self-employed still report financial difficulties with essential expenses. • Among the under 30s, 38 per cent report struggling to pay basic expenses compared to 27 per cent of over 30s. And 35 per cent of self-employed workers who are parents reported financial difficulties. • Applications for government support have dropped significantly. • A small group of self-employed have applied for all rounds of support. • Uncertainty around eligibility for government support has been high for the last 18 months and increased in 2021. This higher degree of uncertainty contributed to the decrease in claims. • After a year in which movements out of self-employment have prevailed, inflows have started to pick up. However, new entrants to self-mployment appear more precarious and show less resilience to adverse economic conditions than those already in self-employment. • Overall, the survey results show an unequal impact of the crisis on the self-employed, with the observed inequalities being connected to their demographics and business sector.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brinklow, Laurie; Ellsmoor, James; Randall, James; Rouby, Manon; Sajeva, Giulia; Shetye, Aditi; Sindico, Francesco;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | RES (841546)

    Final Report of the COVID-19 Island Insights Series.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hinsliff-Smith, K.; Wray, Jane; White, Caroline; Keefe, Janice;
    Publisher: International Long-term Care Policy Network (ILPN) and Care Policy and Evaluation Centre (CPEC)
    Country: United Kingdom

    October 11th 2021 was Canadian Thanksgiving Day and LTCCOVID also hosted an international seminar on care home research. This enabled us both to discover similarities between the UK and Canada (Turkey for celebrations!) and connections through our research work in the care home sector through the pandemic. The seminar enabled three research teams to share their findings from recently completed studies delivered by researchers (@livinginhope @EWolverson @SallyBlonde1 @carolinannwhite @dist_care @HinsliffK @Jayne_NurseProf @SarahCGriffiths @SALTY_LTC). All three studies, two conducted in the UK (at Hull and DMU) and one based in Atlantic Canada, had one central theme; to understand the experiences of the care home sector during the pandemic and imposed lockdowns or lockouts.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
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Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
194 Research products, page 1 of 20
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botta, Alberto; Yajima, Giuliano; Porcile, Gabriel;
    Publisher: Post-Keynesian Economic Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    The outbreak of Covid-19 brought back to the forefront the crucial importance of structural change and productive development for economic resilience to economic shocks. Several recent contributions have already stressed the perverse relation that may exist between productive backwardness and the intensity of the Covid-19 socio-economic crisis. In this paper, we analyze the factors that may have hindered productive development for over four decades before the pandemic. We investigate the role of (non-FDI) net capital inflows as a potential source of premature de-industrialization. We consider a sample of 36 developed and developing countries from 1980 to 2017, with major emphasis on the case of emerging and developing (EDE) economies in the context of increasing financial integration. We show that periods of abundant capital inflows may have caused the significant contraction of manufacturing share to employment and GDP, as well as the decrease of the economic complexity index. We also show that phenomena of “perverse” structural change are significantly more relevant in EDE countries than advanced ones. Based on such evidence, we conclude with some policy suggestions highlighting capital controls and external macroprudential measures taming international capital mobility as useful policy tools for promoting long-run productive development on top of strengthening (short-term) financial and macroeconomic stability.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaied, J.; Skinner, J.; Winterbottom, C.; Brook MO, M. O.; Thornley, A.; Turner, C.; Newell, D.; Lasserson, Daniel; Bottomley, M. J.;
    Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pattaro, Serena;
    Publisher: Scottish Centre for Administrative Data Research
    Country: United Kingdom

    There are occupational disparities in the risk of COVID-19. In this Data Insights, we explore how COVID-19 mortality rates vary by occupation for women and men in Scotland in the period between 1st March 2020 and 31st January 2021. Using a national novel linked data collection, we contrast preliminary results for Scotland with those from a similar linked data study for England.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, A; Bou-Antoun, S; Guy, R; Brown, CS; Hopkins, S; Gerver, S;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background Antibacterial prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) accounts for almost half of all prescribing in primary care. Nearly a quarter of antibacterial prescribing in primary care is estimated to be inappropriate, the greatest being for RTIs. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the provision of healthcare services and impacted the levels of antibacterials prescribed. Objectives To describe the changes in community antibacterial prescribing for RTIs in winter 2020–21 in England. Methods RTI antibacterial prescribing was measured in prescription items/1000 population for primary care from January 2014 and in DDDs/1000 population/day for the totality of RTI prescribing [combined with Accident & Emergency (A&E) in secondary care], from January 2016 to February 2021. Trends were assessed using negative binomial regression and seasonally adjusted interrupted time-series analysis. Results Antibacterials prescribed for RTIs reduced by a further 12.4% per season compared with pre-COVID (P < 0.001). In winter 2020–21, RTI prescriptions almost halved compared with the previous winter in 2019–20 (P < 0.001). The trend observed for total RTI prescribing (primary care with A&E) was similar to that observed in the community alone. Conclusions During COVID-19, RTI prescribing reduced in the community and the expected rise in winter was not seen in 2020–21. We found no evidence that RTI prescribing shifted from primary care to A&E in secondary care. The most likely explanation is a decrease in RTIs and presentations to primary care associated with national prevention measures for COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Galvin, Emer; Desselle, Shane; Gavin, Blánaid; Quigley, Etain; Flear, Mark; Kilbride, Ken; McNicholas, Fiona; Cullinan, Shane; Hayden, John;
    Publisher: HRB
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic response has led to an exponential increase in the use and spread of telemedicine internationally. In community mental health care settings, telemedicine services were implemented within a few weeks, with little time for rigorous planning. Despite the reported acceptability of telemedicine by patients and clinicians, barriers to its implementation have come to light. There is now a need to investigate these barriers, and facilitators, as telemedicine begins to show potential promise beyond the pandemic. We propose a review that aims to identify the factors affecting the implementation of telemedicine consultations for patients with mental health conditions in the community.Methods: A systematic review will be conducted and reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Five electronic databases will be searched using a pre-defined search strategy from 2016 to 2021. Only studies of synchronous, interactive telemedicine consultations conducted via video, phone or live messaging between patients and providers will be included. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods studies will be eligible for inclusion. Only studies published in the English language will be included. Titles and abstracts will be screened by two reviewers. Full text articles will be screened by a single reviewer, with a random 20% sample screened by a second reviewer. The methodological quality of studies will be assessed using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool (MMAT) by two reviewers. Data will be extracted and tabulated to address the aims of the review. A narrative synthesis will be conducted and reported factors will be mapped to the domains of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR).Conclusion: By identifying the factors that influence the implementation of telemedicine consultations for patients with mental conditions in the community, consideration can be given to both barriers and facilitators that could be addressed in future mental health services planning.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Connock, A;
    Publisher: Bite-Sized Books
    Country: United Kingdom

    In Spring 2020, a large percentage of the UK population believed outlandish Covid19 conspiracies. Social media disinformation was powerful, and mainstream countering strategies insufficiently targeted social channels. But commercial sanctions on platforms could prove the winning strategy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Blackburn, Robert; Machin, Stephen; Ventura, Maria;
    Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics
    Country: United Kingdom

    The fourth LSE-CEP survey of self-employment was undertaken in September 2021, following the previous three of May 2020, September 2020 and February 2021. • The economic fortunes of self-employed workers have been hit hard throughout the pandemic. They have seen some improvement since January 2021, although incomes and profits are still notably some way below pre-crisis levels. • Just below 30 per cent of self-employed still report financial difficulties with essential expenses. • Among the under 30s, 38 per cent report struggling to pay basic expenses compared to 27 per cent of over 30s. And 35 per cent of self-employed workers who are parents reported financial difficulties. • Applications for government support have dropped significantly. • A small group of self-employed have applied for all rounds of support. • Uncertainty around eligibility for government support has been high for the last 18 months and increased in 2021. This higher degree of uncertainty contributed to the decrease in claims. • After a year in which movements out of self-employment have prevailed, inflows have started to pick up. However, new entrants to self-mployment appear more precarious and show less resilience to adverse economic conditions than those already in self-employment. • Overall, the survey results show an unequal impact of the crisis on the self-employed, with the observed inequalities being connected to their demographics and business sector.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brinklow, Laurie; Ellsmoor, James; Randall, James; Rouby, Manon; Sajeva, Giulia; Shetye, Aditi; Sindico, Francesco;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | RES (841546)

    Final Report of the COVID-19 Island Insights Series.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hinsliff-Smith, K.; Wray, Jane; White, Caroline; Keefe, Janice;
    Publisher: International Long-term Care Policy Network (ILPN) and Care Policy and Evaluation Centre (CPEC)
    Country: United Kingdom

    October 11th 2021 was Canadian Thanksgiving Day and LTCCOVID also hosted an international seminar on care home research. This enabled us both to discover similarities between the UK and Canada (Turkey for celebrations!) and connections through our research work in the care home sector through the pandemic. The seminar enabled three research teams to share their findings from recently completed studies delivered by researchers (@livinginhope @EWolverson @SallyBlonde1 @carolinannwhite @dist_care @HinsliffK @Jayne_NurseProf @SarahCGriffiths @SALTY_LTC). All three studies, two conducted in the UK (at Hull and DMU) and one based in Atlantic Canada, had one central theme; to understand the experiences of the care home sector during the pandemic and imposed lockdowns or lockouts.