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248 Research products, page 1 of 25

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Schneider, Luisa;
    Publisher: Culture in Quarantine
    Country: Netherlands

    ImagineThe internet stops workingelectricity is cutthe many screens which connect you to the world turn blackyou no longer have access to your bank accountor functioning credits cardsthe walls behind which you retreated fade awayand you find yourself under the open skynow you are like menothing but a “dangerous body” on the streetwhat can you do now?what must you do now?out in the open where an invisible virus lurks?you roamroam the city forfoodinformationand means to protect those you love

  • Restricted Italian
    Authors: 
    Caruso Giovanni Paolo; Ceregini Andrea;
    Country: Italy

    Il documento descrive l'implementazione di una Virtual Private Network per migliorare la sicurezza della rete istituzionale e contestualmente permettere al personale di accedere, da remoto, alle risorse presenti in essa.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Mena Fluhmann, Rodrigo; Hilhorst, Thea;
    Publisher: BLISS: The ISS Blog on Global Development and Social Justice
    Country: Netherlands
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Somville, Francis; Van Bogaert, P; Vercauteren, Leonie; De Cauwer, Harald; Mortelmans, Luc; Pauwels, Sofie; De Boeck, Lisanne; Franck, Eric;
    Country: Belgium
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Restricted English
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Our March 2021 edition of this review showed thoracic imaging computed tomography (CT) to be sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19 pneumonia. This new edition is an update of the review. Objectives: Our objectives were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic imaging in people with suspected COVID-19; assess the rate of positive imaging in people who had an initial reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) negative result and a positive RT-PCR result on follow-up; and evaluate the accuracy of thoracic imaging for screening COVID-19 in asymptomatic individuals. The secondary objective was to assess threshold effects of index test positivity on accuracy. Search methods: We searched the COVID-19 Living Evidence Database from the University of Bern, the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register, The Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library, and repositories of COVID-19 publications through to 17 February 2021. We did not apply any language restrictions. Selection criteria: We included diagnostic accuracy studies of all designs, except for case-control, that recruited participants of any age group suspected to have COVID-19. Studies had to assess chest CT, chest X-ray, or ultrasound of the lungs for the diagnosis of COVID-19, use a reference standard that included RT-PCR, and report estimates of test accuracy or provide data from which we could compute estimates. We excluded studies that used imaging as part of the reference standard and studies that excluded participants with normal index test results. Data collection and analysis: The review authors independently and in duplicate screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias and applicability concerns using QUADAS-2. We presented sensitivity and specificity per study on paired forest plots, and summarized pooled estimates in tables. We used a bivariate meta-analysis model where appropriate. Main results: We included 98 studies in this review. Of these, 94 were included for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic imaging in the evaluation of people with suspected COVID-19. Eight studies were included for assessing the rate of positive imaging in individuals with initial RT-PCR negative results and positive RT-PCR results on follow-up, and 10 studies were included for evaluating the accuracy of thoracic imaging for imagining asymptomatic individuals. For all 98 included studies, risk of bias was high or unclear in 52 (53%) studies with respect to participant selection, in 64 (65%) studies with respect to reference standard, in 46 (47%) studies with respect to index test, and in 48 (49%) studies with respect to flow and timing. Concerns about the applicability of the evidence to: participants were high or unclear in eight (8%) studies; index test were high or unclear in seven (7%) studies; and reference standard were high or unclear in seven (7%) studies. Imaging in people with suspected COVID-19. We included 94 studies. Eighty-seven studies evaluated one imaging modality, and seven studies evaluated two imaging modalities. All studies used RT-PCR alone or in combination with other criteria (for example, clinical signs and symptoms, positive contacts) as the reference standard for the diagnosis of COVID-19. For chest CT (69 studies, 28285 participants, 14,342 (51%) cases), sensitivities ranged from 45% to 100%, and specificities from 10% to 99%. The pooled sensitivity of chest CT was 86.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83.6 to 89.6), and pooled specificity was 78.3% (95% CI 73.7 to 82.3). Definition for index test positivity was a source of heterogeneity for sensitivity, but not specificity. Reference standard was not a source of heterogeneity. For chest X-ray (17 studies, 8529 participants, 5303 (62%) cases), the sensitivity ranged from 44% to 94% and specificity from 24 to 93%. The pooled sensitivity of chest X-ray was 73.1% (95% CI 64. to -80.5), and pooled specificity was 73.3% (95% CI 61.9 to 82.2). Definition for index test positivity was not found to be a source of heterogeneity. Definition for index test positivity and reference standard were not found to be sources of heterogeneity. For ultrasound of the lungs (15 studies, 2410 participants, 1158 (48%) cases), the sensitivity ranged from 73% to 94% and the specificity ranged from 21% to 98%. The pooled sensitivity of ultrasound was 88.9% (95% CI 84.9 to 92.0), and the pooled specificity was 72.2% (95% CI 58.8 to 82.5). Definition for index test positivity and reference standard were not found to be sources of heterogeneity. Indirect comparisons of modalities evaluated across all 94 studies indicated that chest CT and ultrasound gave higher sensitivity estimates than X-ray (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.001, respectively). Chest CT and ultrasound gave similar sensitivities (P=0.42). All modalities had similar specificities (CT versus X-ray P = 0.36; CT versus ultrasound P = 0.32; X-ray versus ultrasound P = 0.89). Imaging in PCR-negative people who subsequently became positive. For rate of positive imaging in individuals with initial RT-PCR negative results, we included 8 studies (7 CT, 1 ultrasound) with a total of 198 participants suspected of having COVID-19, all of whom had a final diagnosis of COVID-19. Most studies (7/8) evaluated CT. Of 177 participants with initially negative RT-PCR who had positive RT-PCR results on follow-up testing, 75.8% (95% CI 45.3 to 92.2) had positive CT findings. Imaging in asymptomatic PCR-positive people. For imaging asymptomatic individuals, we included 10 studies (7 CT, 1 X-ray, 2 ultrasound) with a total of 3548 asymptomatic participants, of whom 364 (10%) had a final diagnosis of COVID-19. For chest CT (7 studies, 3134 participants, 315 (10%) cases), the pooled sensitivity was 55.7% (95% CI 35.4 to 74.3) and the pooled specificity was 91.1% (95% CI 82.6 to 95.7). Authors' conclusions: Chest CT and ultrasound of the lungs are sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19. Chest X-ray is moderately sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19. Thus, chest CT and ultrasound may have more utility for ruling out COVID-19 than for differentiating SARS-CoV-2 infection from other causes of respiratory illness. The uncertainty resulting from high or unclear risk of bias and the heterogeneity of included studies limit our ability to confidently draw conclusions based on our results.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Zizhen; Zeb, Anwar; Egbelowo, Oluwaseun F; Erturk, Vedat S;
    Country: South Africa

    Abstract In this work, we formulate and analyze a new mathematical model for COVID-19 epidemic with isolated class in fractional order. This model is described by a system of fractional-order differential equations model and includes five classes, namely, S (susceptible class), E (exposed class), I (infected class), Q (isolated class), and R (recovered class). Dynamics and numerical approximations for the proposed fractional-order model are studied. Firstly, positivity and boundedness of the model are established. Secondly, the basic reproduction number of the model is calculated by using the next generation matrix approach. Then, asymptotic stability of the model is investigated. Lastly, we apply the adaptive predictor–corrector algorithm and fourth-order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method to simulate the proposed model. Consequently, a set of numerical simulations are performed to support the validity of the theoretical results. The numerical simulations indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretical results and numerical ones.

  • Restricted Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    de Jong, Frank;
    Publisher: Open Universiteit
    Country: Netherlands

    Acht weken na sluiting van het mbo hebben we op 8mei een vragenlijstje voor mbo-studenten en -docenten verspreid op 25 mei hebben we even een tussenstand opgenomen. Het valt sterk op dat 70% vindt dat ze dezelfde kennis hebben geleerd als op school. Het leren van vaardigheden en gedrag vormt echter een knelpunt! Ook zijn veel docenten (72%) voornemens om hun positieve ervaringen (63%) in te zetten in de herstart van het mbo, waarschijnlijk hybride, onderwijs. Meer inzichten willen graag met jullie delen in de infographic. Meer uitgebreidere informatie hebben we in een kort artikeltje neergeschreven. Dat kan je lezen in pfd in ecbo news na 2 juni.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Margaretha Marie Elisabeth Müller;
    Publisher: Rīgas Stradiņa universitāte
    Country: Latvia

    Medicīna Veselības aprūpe Medicine Health Care Saistībā ar Kovid-19 pandēmiju Multisistēmu iekaisuma sindroms bērniem (MIS-C) ir kļuvusi par jaunu slimību bērnu populācijā. Tiek uzskatīts, ka tā ir SARS-CoV-2 infekcijas imūnmediēta pēcinfekcijas komplikācija, lai gan tieša cēloņsakarība starp abām slimībām vēl nav skaidra. Sindroms izpaužas ar līdzīgu klīnisko ainu kā Kavasaki slimība un toksiskā šoka sindroms, izraisot vairāku orgānu mazspēju. Tas izpaužas 2-6 nedēļas pēc akūtas Covid-19 infekcijas ar drudzi un galvenokārt kuņģa un zarnu trakta, sirds un asinsvadu sistēmas un gļotādas simptomiem. Bieži sastopama hemodinamikas nestabilitāte un šoka attīstība ar vazopresoru terapiju. Iekaisuma marķieri ir vispārēji paaugstināti. Ārstēšana ietver imunomodulējošu un pretiekaisuma terapiju. Lielākajai daļai bērnu nepieciešama intensīva terapija. Tomēr kopējais mirstības līmenis ir zems, un prognoze ir laba. Sindroma ilgtermiņa sekas pašlaik nav zināmas, tāpēc ir nepieciešama regulāra novērošana. Šis jaunais sindroms ir plaši novērots, un visā pasaulē ir publicēti gadījumu apraksti un pētījumi, lai to raksturotu. Es esmu tos pārskatījis, lai aprakstītu sindromu attiecībā uz tā patofizioloģiju, klīnisko izpausmi, laboratorijas un attēlu izmaiņām, ārstēšanas iespējām un iznākumu saskaņā ar pašreizējo zināšanu līmeni. Multisystem inflammatory disease in children (MIS-C) has been emerging as a novel condition in the paediatric population in relation to the Covid-19 pandemic. It is thought to be an immune-mediated post-infectious complication of a SARS-CoV-2 infection, although the direct causality between the two is not yet understood. The syndrome presents with a similar clinical picture as Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome, leading to multi-organ failure. It presents 2 to 6 weeks after an acute Covid-19 infection with fever and predominantly gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and mucocutaneous symptoms. Haemodynamic instability and development of shock with vasopressor treatment is common. Inflammatory markers are universally increased. Treatment includes immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory therapy. With most children requiring intensive care treatment. Nonetheless, the overall mortality rate is low, and the prognosis good. Long-term sequelae of the syndrome is unknown at this point in time, warranting a regular follow-up. This new syndrome has been extensively observed and case reports and studies have been published across the globe, to characterise it. I have reviewed these, to describe the syndrome regarding its pathophysiology, clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging changes, treatment options and outcome, according to the current state of knowledge.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Duilio F Manara; Giulia Villa; Lisa Korelic; Cristina Arrigoni; Federica Dellafiore; Valentina Milani; Greta Ghizzardi; Arianna Magon; Noemi Giannetta; Rosario Caruso;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Interviews from Manara DF, Villa G, Korelic L, Arrigoni C, Dellafiore F, Milani V, Ghizzardi G, Magon A, Giannetta N, Caruso R. One-week longitudinal daily description of moral distress, coping, and general health in healthcare workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy: A quantitative diary study. Acta Biomed. 2021 Oct 5;92(S6):e2021461. doi: 10.23750/abm.v92iS6.12313. PMID: 34739455. Abstract Background and aim of the work .The fluctuation from day to day within a working week of moral distress, coping, and general health of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic has been poorly studied. This study described the weekly fluctuation from day to day of moral distress, coping, and general health in frontline HCWs who worked during the first epidemic wave (May-June 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. Methods: This study has an intensive longitudinal design, and a convenience sampling procedure was employed to enroll physicians, nurses, allied health professions, and healthcare assistants. Data collection was performed using diary encompassed four sections: a socio-demographic form (required only at the baseline data collection) and three scales to assess moral distress, coping, and general health. Results: Results confirmed poor perceived health and mild moral distress in frontline HCWs, especially in HCWs with offspring, during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and the stability of their daily perception over a working week regarding moral distress, general health, and avoidant coping strategy, while approach coping strategy reported a slight fluctuation over time. Conclusions: Accordingly, on the one hand, these results confirm that outcomes regarding mental health and moral distress are pretty stable and provide insights, on the other hand, regarding the possible organizational interventions to support approach coping strategy as it seems more susceptible to variation over time.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ben-Menahem, Shiko; Erden, Zeynep;
    Publisher: California Management Review Insights
    Country: Netherlands
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
248 Research products, page 1 of 25
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Schneider, Luisa;
    Publisher: Culture in Quarantine
    Country: Netherlands

    ImagineThe internet stops workingelectricity is cutthe many screens which connect you to the world turn blackyou no longer have access to your bank accountor functioning credits cardsthe walls behind which you retreated fade awayand you find yourself under the open skynow you are like menothing but a “dangerous body” on the streetwhat can you do now?what must you do now?out in the open where an invisible virus lurks?you roamroam the city forfoodinformationand means to protect those you love

  • Restricted Italian
    Authors: 
    Caruso Giovanni Paolo; Ceregini Andrea;
    Country: Italy

    Il documento descrive l'implementazione di una Virtual Private Network per migliorare la sicurezza della rete istituzionale e contestualmente permettere al personale di accedere, da remoto, alle risorse presenti in essa.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Mena Fluhmann, Rodrigo; Hilhorst, Thea;
    Publisher: BLISS: The ISS Blog on Global Development and Social Justice
    Country: Netherlands
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Somville, Francis; Van Bogaert, P; Vercauteren, Leonie; De Cauwer, Harald; Mortelmans, Luc; Pauwels, Sofie; De Boeck, Lisanne; Franck, Eric;
    Country: Belgium
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Restricted English
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Our March 2021 edition of this review showed thoracic imaging computed tomography (CT) to be sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19 pneumonia. This new edition is an update of the review. Objectives: Our objectives were to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic imaging in people with suspected COVID-19; assess the rate of positive imaging in people who had an initial reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) negative result and a positive RT-PCR result on follow-up; and evaluate the accuracy of thoracic imaging for screening COVID-19 in asymptomatic individuals. The secondary objective was to assess threshold effects of index test positivity on accuracy. Search methods: We searched the COVID-19 Living Evidence Database from the University of Bern, the Cochrane COVID-19 Study Register, The Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library, and repositories of COVID-19 publications through to 17 February 2021. We did not apply any language restrictions. Selection criteria: We included diagnostic accuracy studies of all designs, except for case-control, that recruited participants of any age group suspected to have COVID-19. Studies had to assess chest CT, chest X-ray, or ultrasound of the lungs for the diagnosis of COVID-19, use a reference standard that included RT-PCR, and report estimates of test accuracy or provide data from which we could compute estimates. We excluded studies that used imaging as part of the reference standard and studies that excluded participants with normal index test results. Data collection and analysis: The review authors independently and in duplicate screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias and applicability concerns using QUADAS-2. We presented sensitivity and specificity per study on paired forest plots, and summarized pooled estimates in tables. We used a bivariate meta-analysis model where appropriate. Main results: We included 98 studies in this review. Of these, 94 were included for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic imaging in the evaluation of people with suspected COVID-19. Eight studies were included for assessing the rate of positive imaging in individuals with initial RT-PCR negative results and positive RT-PCR results on follow-up, and 10 studies were included for evaluating the accuracy of thoracic imaging for imagining asymptomatic individuals. For all 98 included studies, risk of bias was high or unclear in 52 (53%) studies with respect to participant selection, in 64 (65%) studies with respect to reference standard, in 46 (47%) studies with respect to index test, and in 48 (49%) studies with respect to flow and timing. Concerns about the applicability of the evidence to: participants were high or unclear in eight (8%) studies; index test were high or unclear in seven (7%) studies; and reference standard were high or unclear in seven (7%) studies. Imaging in people with suspected COVID-19. We included 94 studies. Eighty-seven studies evaluated one imaging modality, and seven studies evaluated two imaging modalities. All studies used RT-PCR alone or in combination with other criteria (for example, clinical signs and symptoms, positive contacts) as the reference standard for the diagnosis of COVID-19. For chest CT (69 studies, 28285 participants, 14,342 (51%) cases), sensitivities ranged from 45% to 100%, and specificities from 10% to 99%. The pooled sensitivity of chest CT was 86.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83.6 to 89.6), and pooled specificity was 78.3% (95% CI 73.7 to 82.3). Definition for index test positivity was a source of heterogeneity for sensitivity, but not specificity. Reference standard was not a source of heterogeneity. For chest X-ray (17 studies, 8529 participants, 5303 (62%) cases), the sensitivity ranged from 44% to 94% and specificity from 24 to 93%. The pooled sensitivity of chest X-ray was 73.1% (95% CI 64. to -80.5), and pooled specificity was 73.3% (95% CI 61.9 to 82.2). Definition for index test positivity was not found to be a source of heterogeneity. Definition for index test positivity and reference standard were not found to be sources of heterogeneity. For ultrasound of the lungs (15 studies, 2410 participants, 1158 (48%) cases), the sensitivity ranged from 73% to 94% and the specificity ranged from 21% to 98%. The pooled sensitivity of ultrasound was 88.9% (95% CI 84.9 to 92.0), and the pooled specificity was 72.2% (95% CI 58.8 to 82.5). Definition for index test positivity and reference standard were not found to be sources of heterogeneity. Indirect comparisons of modalities evaluated across all 94 studies indicated that chest CT and ultrasound gave higher sensitivity estimates than X-ray (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.001, respectively). Chest CT and ultrasound gave similar sensitivities (P=0.42). All modalities had similar specificities (CT versus X-ray P = 0.36; CT versus ultrasound P = 0.32; X-ray versus ultrasound P = 0.89). Imaging in PCR-negative people who subsequently became positive. For rate of positive imaging in individuals with initial RT-PCR negative results, we included 8 studies (7 CT, 1 ultrasound) with a total of 198 participants suspected of having COVID-19, all of whom had a final diagnosis of COVID-19. Most studies (7/8) evaluated CT. Of 177 participants with initially negative RT-PCR who had positive RT-PCR results on follow-up testing, 75.8% (95% CI 45.3 to 92.2) had positive CT findings. Imaging in asymptomatic PCR-positive people. For imaging asymptomatic individuals, we included 10 studies (7 CT, 1 X-ray, 2 ultrasound) with a total of 3548 asymptomatic participants, of whom 364 (10%) had a final diagnosis of COVID-19. For chest CT (7 studies, 3134 participants, 315 (10%) cases), the pooled sensitivity was 55.7% (95% CI 35.4 to 74.3) and the pooled specificity was 91.1% (95% CI 82.6 to 95.7). Authors' conclusions: Chest CT and ultrasound of the lungs are sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19. Chest X-ray is moderately sensitive and moderately specific in diagnosing COVID-19. Thus, chest CT and ultrasound may have more utility for ruling out COVID-19 than for differentiating SARS-CoV-2 infection from other causes of respiratory illness. The uncertainty resulting from high or unclear risk of bias and the heterogeneity of included studies limit our ability to confidently draw conclusions based on our results.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Zizhen; Zeb, Anwar; Egbelowo, Oluwaseun F; Erturk, Vedat S;
    Country: South Africa

    Abstract In this work, we formulate and analyze a new mathematical model for COVID-19 epidemic with isolated class in fractional order. This model is described by a system of fractional-order differential equations model and includes five classes, namely, S (susceptible class), E (exposed class), I (infected class), Q (isolated class), and R (recovered class). Dynamics and numerical approximations for the proposed fractional-order model are studied. Firstly, positivity and boundedness of the model are established. Secondly, the basic reproduction number of the model is calculated by using the next generation matrix approach. Then, asymptotic stability of the model is investigated. Lastly, we apply the adaptive predictor–corrector algorithm and fourth-order Runge–Kutta (RK4) method to simulate the proposed model. Consequently, a set of numerical simulations are performed to support the validity of the theoretical results. The numerical simulations indicate that there is a good agreement between theoretical results and numerical ones.

  • Restricted Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    de Jong, Frank;
    Publisher: Open Universiteit
    Country: Netherlands

    Acht weken na sluiting van het mbo hebben we op 8mei een vragenlijstje voor mbo-studenten en -docenten verspreid op 25 mei hebben we even een tussenstand opgenomen. Het valt sterk op dat 70% vindt dat ze dezelfde kennis hebben geleerd als op school. Het leren van vaardigheden en gedrag vormt echter een knelpunt! Ook zijn veel docenten (72%) voornemens om hun positieve ervaringen (63%) in te zetten in de herstart van het mbo, waarschijnlijk hybride, onderwijs. Meer inzichten willen graag met jullie delen in de infographic. Meer uitgebreidere informatie hebben we in een kort artikeltje neergeschreven. Dat kan je lezen in pfd in ecbo news na 2 juni.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Margaretha Marie Elisabeth Müller;
    Publisher: Rīgas Stradiņa universitāte
    Country: Latvia

    Medicīna Veselības aprūpe Medicine Health Care Saistībā ar Kovid-19 pandēmiju Multisistēmu iekaisuma sindroms bērniem (MIS-C) ir kļuvusi par jaunu slimību bērnu populācijā. Tiek uzskatīts, ka tā ir SARS-CoV-2 infekcijas imūnmediēta pēcinfekcijas komplikācija, lai gan tieša cēloņsakarība starp abām slimībām vēl nav skaidra. Sindroms izpaužas ar līdzīgu klīnisko ainu kā Kavasaki slimība un toksiskā šoka sindroms, izraisot vairāku orgānu mazspēju. Tas izpaužas 2-6 nedēļas pēc akūtas Covid-19 infekcijas ar drudzi un galvenokārt kuņģa un zarnu trakta, sirds un asinsvadu sistēmas un gļotādas simptomiem. Bieži sastopama hemodinamikas nestabilitāte un šoka attīstība ar vazopresoru terapiju. Iekaisuma marķieri ir vispārēji paaugstināti. Ārstēšana ietver imunomodulējošu un pretiekaisuma terapiju. Lielākajai daļai bērnu nepieciešama intensīva terapija. Tomēr kopējais mirstības līmenis ir zems, un prognoze ir laba. Sindroma ilgtermiņa sekas pašlaik nav zināmas, tāpēc ir nepieciešama regulāra novērošana. Šis jaunais sindroms ir plaši novērots, un visā pasaulē ir publicēti gadījumu apraksti un pētījumi, lai to raksturotu. Es esmu tos pārskatījis, lai aprakstītu sindromu attiecībā uz tā patofizioloģiju, klīnisko izpausmi, laboratorijas un attēlu izmaiņām, ārstēšanas iespējām un iznākumu saskaņā ar pašreizējo zināšanu līmeni. Multisystem inflammatory disease in children (MIS-C) has been emerging as a novel condition in the paediatric population in relation to the Covid-19 pandemic. It is thought to be an immune-mediated post-infectious complication of a SARS-CoV-2 infection, although the direct causality between the two is not yet understood. The syndrome presents with a similar clinical picture as Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome, leading to multi-organ failure. It presents 2 to 6 weeks after an acute Covid-19 infection with fever and predominantly gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and mucocutaneous symptoms. Haemodynamic instability and development of shock with vasopressor treatment is common. Inflammatory markers are universally increased. Treatment includes immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory therapy. With most children requiring intensive care treatment. Nonetheless, the overall mortality rate is low, and the prognosis good. Long-term sequelae of the syndrome is unknown at this point in time, warranting a regular follow-up. This new syndrome has been extensively observed and case reports and studies have been published across the globe, to characterise it. I have reviewed these, to describe the syndrome regarding its pathophysiology, clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging changes, treatment options and outcome, according to the current state of knowledge.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Duilio F Manara; Giulia Villa; Lisa Korelic; Cristina Arrigoni; Federica Dellafiore; Valentina Milani; Greta Ghizzardi; Arianna Magon; Noemi Giannetta; Rosario Caruso;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Interviews from Manara DF, Villa G, Korelic L, Arrigoni C, Dellafiore F, Milani V, Ghizzardi G, Magon A, Giannetta N, Caruso R. One-week longitudinal daily description of moral distress, coping, and general health in healthcare workers during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy: A quantitative diary study. Acta Biomed. 2021 Oct 5;92(S6):e2021461. doi: 10.23750/abm.v92iS6.12313. PMID: 34739455. Abstract Background and aim of the work .The fluctuation from day to day within a working week of moral distress, coping, and general health of frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) in facing the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic has been poorly studied. This study described the weekly fluctuation from day to day of moral distress, coping, and general health in frontline HCWs who worked during the first epidemic wave (May-June 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy. Methods: This study has an intensive longitudinal design, and a convenience sampling procedure was employed to enroll physicians, nurses, allied health professions, and healthcare assistants. Data collection was performed using diary encompassed four sections: a socio-demographic form (required only at the baseline data collection) and three scales to assess moral distress, coping, and general health. Results: Results confirmed poor perceived health and mild moral distress in frontline HCWs, especially in HCWs with offspring, during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and the stability of their daily perception over a working week regarding moral distress, general health, and avoidant coping strategy, while approach coping strategy reported a slight fluctuation over time. Conclusions: Accordingly, on the one hand, these results confirm that outcomes regarding mental health and moral distress are pretty stable and provide insights, on the other hand, regarding the possible organizational interventions to support approach coping strategy as it seems more susceptible to variation over time.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ben-Menahem, Shiko; Erden, Zeynep;
    Publisher: California Management Review Insights
    Country: Netherlands