Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
28 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • COVID-19
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • DK
  • English

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meyerowitz-Katz, Gideon; Kashnitsky, Ilya;
    Publisher: OSF
    Country: Denmark

    We are writing this openly-published letter to express deep concerns regarding the paper recently published in JAMA Network Open: Estimation of US Children’s Educational Attainment and Years of Life Lost Associated With Primary School Closures During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.28786The paper by Christakis, Van Cleve, and Zimmerman(2020,abbrev. CVZ) is built upon multiple critically flawed assumptions, obvious misuse of the standard analytical tools, and clear mistakes in study design. Additionally, the analysis presented contains crucial mathematical and statistical errors that completely revert the main results, sufficient that if the estimates had been calculated according to the declared methodology, the results would completely contradict the stated conclusions and policy recommendations. These are not idle criticisms. This study has received enormous public attention, and its results immediately appeared in discussions of public health policies around schools worldwide. The central question is resolving an evidence base for the inevitable tradeoff between (a) the very real harms of missed education provoked by policies that decrease viral spread vs. (b) the resumption of education as a social good which increases viral spread. This is an incredibly important public health question, and it demands careful cost-benefit analysis. To that end, this paper adds no usable evidence whatsoever.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bohlbro, Anders Solitander; Møller Jensen, Andreas; Damerow, Sabine;
    Country: Denmark

    In the Covid-19 pandemic, it seems that African countries have been largely spared from the devastating effects observed elsewhere. Working and living in Guinea-Bissau, one of the poorest and most fragile countries in the world located in West Africa, we wonder: How can the world know that there are only few Covid-19 cases in a country where the health system is weak and access to Covid-19 tests very limited? How can the world know that there is a low Covid-19 mortality in a country without a reliable civil registration and vital statistic system? In this article, we explore the (too) many unknowns of Covid-19 in Guinea-Bissau. The article was chosen as the 1st place winner of the 2020 Eye on Global Health Writing Competition.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nissen, Nina; Andersen, Ingrid Charlotte; Simonÿ, Charlotte;
    Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman;
    Publisher: www.ac4tec.com
    Country: Denmark

    A mysterious virus, classified by WHO (World Health Organization) as COVID-19, wrecks global health and potentially endangers the global social, political and economic order[i]. In countering the risks and protecting their populations, nations across the world adopt drastic national restrictions. Authorities temporarily suspend national as well as transnational encounters and connections. The virus, as well as how authorities and societies respond to, might have greater long-term impact. However, If the virus spreads transnationally, why then nation-states favour national protectionism instead of exploring common multilateral solutions? Could the application of national tools solve a seemingly transnational pandemic?Almost worldwide reverberations of state-decrees take effect- unleashing cancellations of public and private gatherings and events. So far, most of the alert and ensuing explanations and justifications mainly concentrate on the affluent world. In parts of the developing world, the ruling elites often ignore pre-consultations. Millions (already suffering from traditional curable malaises and inequalities) confront additional virus-related existential threats. Among the most disadvantaged include the internally and externally displaced refugees in the world. Many of them live in derelict encampments scattered across the Middle East and Africa.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Välikangas, Liisa; Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L.;
    Country: Denmark

    The need is now, but the solution takes over ten years. The race for speed is on, facilitated by billion-dollar fundraising and sustained investment in public-private partnerships. Accelerating COVID-19 vaccine development to “pandemic speed” has included many simultaneous projects, parallel clinical trials, fast-tracking experimental technology, and committing manufacturing capacity before regulatory approval.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Halkier, Henrik; James, Laura;
    Country: Denmark

    Dette vidensindspark giver et overblik over, hvordan europæiske destinationer har reageret på covid-19: Er vi på vej tilbage til det velkendte hurtigst muligt? Eller ses der bevægelse i retning af nye former for turisme, der tilpasser sig særlige post-pandemiske forhold?

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman;
    Publisher: www.ac4tec.com
    Country: Denmark

    In modern societies, including democracies, substantial gap exists between the public and civic-private spheres[i]. In much more aggravated form, such cleavages remain integral to the daily lives of transnational communities (ethnic groups with persistent transnational ties)[ii]. These are communities often excluded from positions of influence at particularly public institutions. In addition, they often endure recurring discursive public assaults leading to internal and external social and political enclosures with disempowering tendencies. At the same time, they formally subordinate to considerably distant bureaucratic public institutions.Paradoxically, though such binary relationships prevail, the dynamics within and around authority-community encounters and connections generates a dialectical relationship in which involved actors separately and collectively contribute to the formation of alternative social and political understandings and even collaborations.The recent media debates and interactions, in connection with a rather controversial covid-19 prevention case in the Danish city of Aarhus, illustrate the potentiality of revaluating the often static pregiven conceptions of the relationship between public authorities and transnational communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Oehmen, Josef; Stingl, Verena; Witz, Petr;
    Publisher: The London School of Economics and Political Science
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom

    Soon, we will all have convinced ourselves that we knew all along what was going to happen. Hindsight bias is how our brain manages its scarce resources and protects us from losing faith.The reality is that for the time being, both policy makers and business leaders have to keep making some of the biggest decisions of their lives under some of the worst uncertainty of their lives. In a previous article, we talked about how we can use resilience thinking to make better choices. Today, we want to look at another crucial aspect: how can we ensure the legitimacy of our actions, i.e., reflect on how much support we can expect from the general public or our employees for what we are about to ask of them.Megaproject management may not be the first area of expertise you turn to for advice in the current situation. We will explain in a little while why you should. Our interest in megaproject management focuses on the risk management side of things, particularly risks surrounding public support (or opposition) of these rather impactful and wide ranging endeavours. Here is why looking at megaprojects for inspiration in the current situation is interesting: They are very significant investments, they cause changes at societal scale (at least locally), they are unique, with a significant dose of first-of-a-kind actions, and at some point they are over and transition what they build into operations. That does sound a bit familiar these days.While legitimacy is important, there are also other factors. Most notably, legality and feasibility. A common pitfall for managers of megaprojects and business leaders or policymakers alike, is to take action that is legal (or at least: later legalised) and feasible, but not seen as legitimate. That leads into dangerous territory of provoking significant resistance.There are three aspects to the legitimacy of megaprojects that also apply to the legitimacy of the rather drastic actions being taken today by governments and business leaders.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
28 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meyerowitz-Katz, Gideon; Kashnitsky, Ilya;
    Publisher: OSF
    Country: Denmark

    We are writing this openly-published letter to express deep concerns regarding the paper recently published in JAMA Network Open: Estimation of US Children’s Educational Attainment and Years of Life Lost Associated With Primary School Closures During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.28786The paper by Christakis, Van Cleve, and Zimmerman(2020,abbrev. CVZ) is built upon multiple critically flawed assumptions, obvious misuse of the standard analytical tools, and clear mistakes in study design. Additionally, the analysis presented contains crucial mathematical and statistical errors that completely revert the main results, sufficient that if the estimates had been calculated according to the declared methodology, the results would completely contradict the stated conclusions and policy recommendations. These are not idle criticisms. This study has received enormous public attention, and its results immediately appeared in discussions of public health policies around schools worldwide. The central question is resolving an evidence base for the inevitable tradeoff between (a) the very real harms of missed education provoked by policies that decrease viral spread vs. (b) the resumption of education as a social good which increases viral spread. This is an incredibly important public health question, and it demands careful cost-benefit analysis. To that end, this paper adds no usable evidence whatsoever.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bohlbro, Anders Solitander; Møller Jensen, Andreas; Damerow, Sabine;
    Country: Denmark

    In the Covid-19 pandemic, it seems that African countries have been largely spared from the devastating effects observed elsewhere. Working and living in Guinea-Bissau, one of the poorest and most fragile countries in the world located in West Africa, we wonder: How can the world know that there are only few Covid-19 cases in a country where the health system is weak and access to Covid-19 tests very limited? How can the world know that there is a low Covid-19 mortality in a country without a reliable civil registration and vital statistic system? In this article, we explore the (too) many unknowns of Covid-19 in Guinea-Bissau. The article was chosen as the 1st place winner of the 2020 Eye on Global Health Writing Competition.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nissen, Nina; Andersen, Ingrid Charlotte; Simonÿ, Charlotte;
    Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman;
    Publisher: www.ac4tec.com
    Country: Denmark

    A mysterious virus, classified by WHO (World Health Organization) as COVID-19, wrecks global health and potentially endangers the global social, political and economic order[i]. In countering the risks and protecting their populations, nations across the world adopt drastic national restrictions. Authorities temporarily suspend national as well as transnational encounters and connections. The virus, as well as how authorities and societies respond to, might have greater long-term impact. However, If the virus spreads transnationally, why then nation-states favour national protectionism instead of exploring common multilateral solutions? Could the application of national tools solve a seemingly transnational pandemic?Almost worldwide reverberations of state-decrees take effect- unleashing cancellations of public and private gatherings and events. So far, most of the alert and ensuing explanations and justifications mainly concentrate on the affluent world. In parts of the developing world, the ruling elites often ignore pre-consultations. Millions (already suffering from traditional curable malaises and inequalities) confront additional virus-related existential threats. Among the most disadvantaged include the internally and externally displaced refugees in the world. Many of them live in derelict encampments scattered across the Middle East and Africa.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Välikangas, Liisa; Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L.;
    Country: Denmark

    The need is now, but the solution takes over ten years. The race for speed is on, facilitated by billion-dollar fundraising and sustained investment in public-private partnerships. Accelerating COVID-19 vaccine development to “pandemic speed” has included many simultaneous projects, parallel clinical trials, fast-tracking experimental technology, and committing manufacturing capacity before regulatory approval.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Halkier, Henrik; James, Laura;
    Country: Denmark

    Dette vidensindspark giver et overblik over, hvordan europæiske destinationer har reageret på covid-19: Er vi på vej tilbage til det velkendte hurtigst muligt? Eller ses der bevægelse i retning af nye former for turisme, der tilpasser sig særlige post-pandemiske forhold?

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sodemann, Morten;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aburto, José Manuel; Schöley, Jonas; Kashnitsky, Ilya; Kashyap, Ridhi;
    Country: Denmark
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman;
    Publisher: www.ac4tec.com
    Country: Denmark

    In modern societies, including democracies, substantial gap exists between the public and civic-private spheres[i]. In much more aggravated form, such cleavages remain integral to the daily lives of transnational communities (ethnic groups with persistent transnational ties)[ii]. These are communities often excluded from positions of influence at particularly public institutions. In addition, they often endure recurring discursive public assaults leading to internal and external social and political enclosures with disempowering tendencies. At the same time, they formally subordinate to considerably distant bureaucratic public institutions.Paradoxically, though such binary relationships prevail, the dynamics within and around authority-community encounters and connections generates a dialectical relationship in which involved actors separately and collectively contribute to the formation of alternative social and political understandings and even collaborations.The recent media debates and interactions, in connection with a rather controversial covid-19 prevention case in the Danish city of Aarhus, illustrate the potentiality of revaluating the often static pregiven conceptions of the relationship between public authorities and transnational communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Oehmen, Josef; Stingl, Verena; Witz, Petr;
    Publisher: The London School of Economics and Political Science
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom

    Soon, we will all have convinced ourselves that we knew all along what was going to happen. Hindsight bias is how our brain manages its scarce resources and protects us from losing faith.The reality is that for the time being, both policy makers and business leaders have to keep making some of the biggest decisions of their lives under some of the worst uncertainty of their lives. In a previous article, we talked about how we can use resilience thinking to make better choices. Today, we want to look at another crucial aspect: how can we ensure the legitimacy of our actions, i.e., reflect on how much support we can expect from the general public or our employees for what we are about to ask of them.Megaproject management may not be the first area of expertise you turn to for advice in the current situation. We will explain in a little while why you should. Our interest in megaproject management focuses on the risk management side of things, particularly risks surrounding public support (or opposition) of these rather impactful and wide ranging endeavours. Here is why looking at megaprojects for inspiration in the current situation is interesting: They are very significant investments, they cause changes at societal scale (at least locally), they are unique, with a significant dose of first-of-a-kind actions, and at some point they are over and transition what they build into operations. That does sound a bit familiar these days.While legitimacy is important, there are also other factors. Most notably, legality and feasibility. A common pitfall for managers of megaprojects and business leaders or policymakers alike, is to take action that is legal (or at least: later legalised) and feasible, but not seen as legitimate. That leads into dangerous territory of provoking significant resistance.There are three aspects to the legitimacy of megaprojects that also apply to the legitimacy of the rather drastic actions being taken today by governments and business leaders.