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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • PURE Aarhus University
  • Journal of Business Venturing Insights
  • Theses@asb
  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nyuk Ling Ma; Wanxi Peng; Chin Fhong Soon; Muhamad Fairus Noor Hassim; Suzana Misbah; Zaidah Rahmat; Wilson Thau Lym Yong; Christian Sonne;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The recently emerged coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which has been characterised as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO), is impacting all parts of human society including agriculture, manufacturing, and tertiary sectors involving all service provision industries. This paper aims to give an overview of potential host reservoirs that could cause pandemic outbreak caused by zoonotic transmission. Amongst all, continues surveillance in slaughterhouse for possible pathogens transmission is needed to prevent next pandemic outbreak. This paper also summary the potential threats of pandemic to agriculture and aquaculture sector that control almost the total food supply chain and market. The history lesson from the past, emerging and reemerging infectious disease including the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2002, Influenza A H1N1 (swine flu) in 2009, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in 2012 and the recent COVID-19 should give us some clue to improve especially the governance to be more ready for next coming pandemic. Highlights • Urbanization promotes the occurrence of zoonotic diseases transmission. • The outbreak of COVID19 affected the global food supply chain. • In preparedness to prevent pandemic outbreak, the continues surveillance of food safety is obligated.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dionysis Bochtis; Lefteris Benos; Maria Lampridi; Vasso Marinoudi; Simon Pearson; Claus G. Sørensen;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Standard Occupational Classification system. The individual tasks associated with each occupation in agricultural production were evaluated on the basis of potential COVID-19 infection risk. As criteria, the most prevalent virus transmission mechanisms were considered, namely the possibility of touching contaminated surfaces and the close proximity of workers. The higher risk occupations within the sector were identified, which facilitates the allocation of worker protection resources to the occupations where they are most needed. In particular, the results demonstrated that 50% of the agricultural workforce and 54% of the workers&rsquo COVID-19 and the restrictive measures towards containing the spread of its infections have seriously affected the agricultural workforce and jeopardized food security. The present study aims at assessing the COVID-19 pandemic impacts on agricultural labor and suggesting strategies to mitigate them. To this end, after an introduction to the pandemic background, the negative consequences on agriculture and the existing mitigation policies, risks to the agricultural workers were benchmarked across the United States&rsquo annual income are at moderate to high risk. As a consequence, a series of control measures need to be adopted so as to enhance the resilience and sustainability of the sector as well as protect farmers including physical distancing, hygiene practices, and personal protection equipment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Katharina Scheidgen; Ali Aslan Gümüsay; Franziska Günzel-Jensen; Gorgi Krlev; Miriam Wolf;
    Countries: Germany, Denmark

    Abstract As physical distancing is a core measure of containing the spread of COVID-19, this pandemic is a crisis that has uprooted social interaction. While current research mainly focuses on crises as a challenge for entrepreneurial ventures and potential regulatory response mechanisms, we complement this research by addressing the question of how crises in general—and COVID-19’s physical distancing measures in particular—shape entrepreneurial opportunities for social innovation. Based on two rounds of data collection—desktop research mapping out 95 entrepreneurial activities in Germany and four focus groups—we find first that entrepreneurs are proactive agents in alleviating the negative consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. They do so by creating two types of digital social innovation: digital brokering and digitized services. Second, we note that negative societal consequences of crises can be buffered by shifts in entrepreneurs’ strategic orientation through improvised venturing, rapid pivoting and pro-social product extension. Third, we note variance in the persistence of changes with consequences for entrepreneurial opportunities and social innovation: Whereas some social innovation are rather ephemeral, others might endure and promise long-term impacts. We offer key insights for the literature on crisis, social innovation and hybrid organizing as well as on the implications for entrepreneurship practice and policy.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Changlei Xia; Su Shiung Lam; Christian Sonne;
    Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Koumoulides; Nikolaos Katsenios; Christoforos-Nikitas Kasimatis; George Xydis; Aspasia Efthimiadou;
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

    COVID-19 has affected the entire existence of humans. Despite the mass vaccination programs globally deployed, some governments are still struggling to minimize human losses, high rates of virus transmission, and the socio-economic shock the entire planet has being gone through. COVID-19 has seriously affected all global socio-economic sectors. In this direction, agriculture, food-security and the environment could not be outside of the high-scale negative impacts, especially during the first year of the imposed lockdowns on both national and global scales. The present study provides information on the impact of COVID-19 and the lockdowns imposed, having as its study area the Republic of Cyprus. The study focuses on potato cultivation and production, and on which level entire agricultural procedures were affected during the examined period of the lockdown. A survey methodology study was done with questionnaires distributed to local potato farmers across the country to quantify and identify the link between the pandemic and the potato sector of the island. It was revealed that manpower was limited due to the lockdowns, the distribution of crops to markets disrupted, long delays in transactions in the agricultural sector were experienced, and economic uncertainty, in general, in Cyprus was experienced, among other impacts. Results of the study indicated that—since COVID-19 is not going to be the last disease—a global transition towards a more resilient and spatially localised food network is required.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nyuk Ling Ma; Wanxi Peng; Chin Fhong Soon; Muhamad Fairus Noor Hassim; Suzana Misbah; Zaidah Rahmat; Wilson Thau Lym Yong; Christian Sonne;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The recently emerged coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which has been characterised as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO), is impacting all parts of human society including agriculture, manufacturing, and tertiary sectors involving all service provision industries. This paper aims to give an overview of potential host reservoirs that could cause pandemic outbreak caused by zoonotic transmission. Amongst all, continues surveillance in slaughterhouse for possible pathogens transmission is needed to prevent next pandemic outbreak. This paper also summary the potential threats of pandemic to agriculture and aquaculture sector that control almost the total food supply chain and market. The history lesson from the past, emerging and reemerging infectious disease including the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2002, Influenza A H1N1 (swine flu) in 2009, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in 2012 and the recent COVID-19 should give us some clue to improve especially the governance to be more ready for next coming pandemic. Highlights • Urbanization promotes the occurrence of zoonotic diseases transmission. • The outbreak of COVID19 affected the global food supply chain. • In preparedness to prevent pandemic outbreak, the continues surveillance of food safety is obligated.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dionysis Bochtis; Lefteris Benos; Maria Lampridi; Vasso Marinoudi; Simon Pearson; Claus G. Sørensen;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Standard Occupational Classification system. The individual tasks associated with each occupation in agricultural production were evaluated on the basis of potential COVID-19 infection risk. As criteria, the most prevalent virus transmission mechanisms were considered, namely the possibility of touching contaminated surfaces and the close proximity of workers. The higher risk occupations within the sector were identified, which facilitates the allocation of worker protection resources to the occupations where they are most needed. In particular, the results demonstrated that 50% of the agricultural workforce and 54% of the workers&rsquo COVID-19 and the restrictive measures towards containing the spread of its infections have seriously affected the agricultural workforce and jeopardized food security. The present study aims at assessing the COVID-19 pandemic impacts on agricultural labor and suggesting strategies to mitigate them. To this end, after an introduction to the pandemic background, the negative consequences on agriculture and the existing mitigation policies, risks to the agricultural workers were benchmarked across the United States&rsquo annual income are at moderate to high risk. As a consequence, a series of control measures need to be adopted so as to enhance the resilience and sustainability of the sector as well as protect farmers including physical distancing, hygiene practices, and personal protection equipment.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Katharina Scheidgen; Ali Aslan Gümüsay; Franziska Günzel-Jensen; Gorgi Krlev; Miriam Wolf;
    Countries: Germany, Denmark

    Abstract As physical distancing is a core measure of containing the spread of COVID-19, this pandemic is a crisis that has uprooted social interaction. While current research mainly focuses on crises as a challenge for entrepreneurial ventures and potential regulatory response mechanisms, we complement this research by addressing the question of how crises in general—and COVID-19’s physical distancing measures in particular—shape entrepreneurial opportunities for social innovation. Based on two rounds of data collection—desktop research mapping out 95 entrepreneurial activities in Germany and four focus groups—we find first that entrepreneurs are proactive agents in alleviating the negative consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. They do so by creating two types of digital social innovation: digital brokering and digitized services. Second, we note that negative societal consequences of crises can be buffered by shifts in entrepreneurs’ strategic orientation through improvised venturing, rapid pivoting and pro-social product extension. Third, we note variance in the persistence of changes with consequences for entrepreneurial opportunities and social innovation: Whereas some social innovation are rather ephemeral, others might endure and promise long-term impacts. We offer key insights for the literature on crisis, social innovation and hybrid organizing as well as on the implications for entrepreneurship practice and policy.

  • Publication . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Changlei Xia; Su Shiung Lam; Christian Sonne;
    Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Koumoulides; Nikolaos Katsenios; Christoforos-Nikitas Kasimatis; George Xydis; Aspasia Efthimiadou;
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

    COVID-19 has affected the entire existence of humans. Despite the mass vaccination programs globally deployed, some governments are still struggling to minimize human losses, high rates of virus transmission, and the socio-economic shock the entire planet has being gone through. COVID-19 has seriously affected all global socio-economic sectors. In this direction, agriculture, food-security and the environment could not be outside of the high-scale negative impacts, especially during the first year of the imposed lockdowns on both national and global scales. The present study provides information on the impact of COVID-19 and the lockdowns imposed, having as its study area the Republic of Cyprus. The study focuses on potato cultivation and production, and on which level entire agricultural procedures were affected during the examined period of the lockdown. A survey methodology study was done with questionnaires distributed to local potato farmers across the country to quantify and identify the link between the pandemic and the potato sector of the island. It was revealed that manpower was limited due to the lockdowns, the distribution of crops to markets disrupted, long delays in transactions in the agricultural sector were experienced, and economic uncertainty, in general, in Cyprus was experienced, among other impacts. Results of the study indicated that—since COVID-19 is not going to be the last disease—a global transition towards a more resilient and spatially localised food network is required.