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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
8 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • COVID-19
  • 2022-2022
  • Open Access
  • Theses@asb
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Klaus G. Grunert; Meike Janssen; Rikke Christensen; Lauranna Teunissen; Isabelle Cuykx; Paulien Decorte; Lucia A. Reisch;
    Countries: Denmark, Belgium

    Abstract: For this study, the authors measured attitudes toward shopping for food and cooking, before and during the first lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, among a sample of 526 Danish consumers, using an online survey. To analyse changes due to the lockdown, they applied a latent class Markov model, which revealed four states: middle of the road, love cooking (and like shopping), like shopping and cooking, and do not like shopping or cooking. In estimating transition probabilities, the findings reveal that most respondents remained in the same state before and during the lockdown, but those that changed were more likely to exhibit relatively higher liking of shopping and cooking. These states also reflect variations in people's food literacy and self-reported food consumption. Finally, respondents with stronger negative emotional reactions to the lockdown were more likely to change their states.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Nygaard-Christensen, Maj; Pedersen, Siri Mørch;
    Country: Denmark

    Under nedlukningen af landet under covid-19-krisen blev udsatte mennesker betegnet som en særlig risikogruppe. På nogle områder har udsatte dog vist sig at have særlig erfaring med at klare udfordringer og forandringer i hverdagen, som de kunne trække på i forhold til at klare coronasituationen

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Cino, Davide; Brandsen, Silke; Bressa, Nathalie Alexandra; Mascheroni, Giovanna; Eriksson, Eva; Zaman, Bieke;
    Country: Denmark

    This report is based on findings from a cross-national qualitative study investigating young people’s digital skills practices in non-formal learning contexts in Belgium, Denmark, and Italy.The goal of this study was to gain better knowledge about how to foster digital skills acquisition and practices in non-formal learning contexts.This study combined 16 observations of digital skills workshops (i.c. programming and robotics workshops), 11 interviews with organisers and moderators of such activities, and 4 subsequent co-design activities with the collaboration of children, organisers, moderators, and researchers.The research activities took place in non-formal learning contexts, such as public libraries, youth clubs, and school spaces used for extra-curricular activities (i.e., outside the formal curriculum). Due to different COVID-19 restrictions across Belgium, Denmark and Italy, flexibility with the research protocol was needed.The main aim of the observations and interviews was to first map existing situated experiences of digital skills workshops across countries, investigate their structure and teaching philosophies, and inform co-design activities. Then, with the co-design activities, we aimed to gain knowledge about potential future trajectories, drawing insights from best practices and formulating recommendations, with Italy focusing on teaching style, Denmark on technology and tools, and Belgium on policy.Our work allowed us to address several research questions, investigating three main areas to be understood as broader thematic units.As a first thematic unit concerned with teaching, we questioned how the philosophies that drive the digital skills workshops ran by moderators and organisers have an impact on the workshop organisation in terms of their formality, activities chosen, teaching styles, imaginaries and values. Indeed, we argue that these matters should not go unnoticed, as part of a hidden curriculum (Gordon, 1982), as these are likely to impact children’s and young people's digital skills acquisition and practices.Secondly, as for the theme of learning, we investigated whether and how the formality and structure of the non-formal digital skills workshops may have influenced children’s digital skills practices and learning, what types of learning strategies were promoted by moderators, and what practices were enacted by the children themselves.As a third theme sensitive to including, we aimed to understand who participates in digital skills workshops and who is excluded, and why, questioning for instance potential sociocultural or material barriers (or absence thereof) shaping the democratisation and distribution of the learning opportunities.Key takeaways Digital skills workshops in non-formal learning context are designed and run with the mission of promoting children’s collaboration and active participation, moving beyond the normative and asymmetrical logic typical of formal education. In this context, across countries, moderators emphasised that they are not to be seen as teachers, but rather as facilitators, framing participants as the main actors of their educational experiences, echoing previous research studying digital skills practices in non-formal learning contexts (Livingstone & Blum-Ross, 2020).6 Although collaboration and active participation are key words in moderators’ and organisers’ imaginaries, most of the times the structure of the learning activities, the affordances of the digital learning environment, and the choices of the children themselves, promoted individualistic practices, where each child worked on their own to achieve their own personal goals. We hereby acknowledge that any educational activity is characterised by, at least partially, asymmetrical relationships, where adults are the ones who are likely to make choices for children. In this sense, the choice of activities, software and, generally, the organisation of the workshop itself, comes down to adults. To counteract this tendency, in implementing teaching strategies, social goals and learning goals should be put forward during the non-formal learning activity. The spatial organisation of the workshops including the features of the technologies and tools can both hinder or facilitate collaboration and learning practices. It is important to align these to the intention and orchestration of moderators so that the room, the physical materials, and the technologies contribute to the overall goals. Also, to design situationally appropriate learning technologies and activities that integrate with current practices, it is important to understand the implicit and explicit social and material structures that constitute the activities and interactions with technologies. Our study further challenges the myth of the digital native, showing that children need appropriate and meaningful external support, individual effort, and motivation to become digitally skilled. Even if informed by a narrow understanding of programming skills as an individual achievement, digital skills workshops are promising for children to train digital practices and acquire new digital skills. A “free” and “open door” approach to the organisation of digital skills workshops does not necessarily mean that it is inclusive, not even when all materials are provided for free by the organisation. Apart from initiatives specifically tailored for usually under-represented groups (including girls, children from lower socio-economic status (SES) households, ethnic minorities), digital skills workshops are mainly attended by upper- or middle-class boys, showing how organisers and moderators struggle in attracting a diverse range of participants. The degree to which parents value programming as beneficial for their children’s future achievements turns out to be one of the main incentives to participate in digital skills workshops, together with the child’s genuine interest in the topic. To foster inclusivity, our findings suggest that workshops should allow a certain degree of open-endedness and freedom, so that children can adjust and embed the projects into their own lived experiences and future-oriented imaginaries. This also means adapting the educational proposals to suit the interests, needs and competences of a wide variety of children with different backgrounds and aspirations. This way the activities can be meaningful for participants to be able to express themselves using technology, while taking into consideration external factors such as the influence of parents and schools which contribute to the opportunities and attendance by participants. Finally, the organisation of digital skills workshops and initiatives should become embedded in the social fabric of the city and/or youth work, conceiving of them as a communitarian effort. This means that an active dialogue between policymakers, organisers and moderators, researchers, parents, and, of course, children themselves from different backgrounds is needed. Participatory co-design among these actors can be a key strategy to promote child-centred approaches that move beyond individualistic accounts of learning, towards the creation of more collaborative, and more inclusive digital skill activities through a systemic and holistic approach.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Antje Rothe; Mary Moloney; Margaret Sims; Pamela Calder; Doreen Blyth; Wendy Boyd; Laura Doan; Fabio Dovigo; Sarah Girlich; Sofia Georgiadou; +8 more
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Denmark

    The relationship between early childhood education and care (ECEC, birth to 8 years), children’s lifelong learning trajectory and the economy is undisputed. This relationship was particularly apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using an auto-ethnographical study, this chapter discusses government responses across 10 countries: Australia, Canada, Chile, Denmark, England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy and Portugal reveal much about the perceptions of children and their early childhood professionals from a political, social and economic stance. The chapter interrogates how government responses situate children and early childhood professionals within the educational landscape in the countries studied and asks how it shapes early childhood education in particular. It illustrates that Governments overall, in the countries studied, did not recognise ECEC as fundamental to the educational continuum. In looking to the future, we question how early childhood education should develop to prepare children for the times we live in so that children are able to flourish and shape future societies with confidence and purpose. Finally, we ask whether the pandemic could possibly see the dawn of a new era in knowledge and understanding of the centrality of Early Childhood Education and Care.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Janne Brammer Damsgaard; Ann Phoenix;
    Country: Denmark

    BackgroundBeside handling the physical impacts of COVID-19 there is more than ever a need to understand what can help when mental health is challenged. Within this context our practical wisdom – our ability to understand and recognise when ‘the other’, for example the patient, is feeling lonely or anxious is particularly important.AimThis article aim to contribute to the understanding of how the competences of health professionals may be advanced by helping them to develop the self-understanding essential to being wise practitioners. MethodThe article is based on a discussion informed by reflections (written in Danish and translated into English) by Masters students (and registered nurses) participating in a university programme “Patient and user focused nursing”. FindingsThe first part of the article considers a student nurse’s reflection on understanding herself and one of her patients. The second part considers reflections on the contemporary world of change from a student nurse trying to engage with a world she experiences as falling apart. The third part addresses the impact of resonant places and encounters in developing self/other understandings; encounters that may also be produced through songs and lyrics. The final part draws conclusions on how it is possible to reach understandings of oneself and others as student health practitioners in a time of pandemic.ConclusionIn the process of developing understanding and recognition, competences built on self-understanding are central for helping to form health professionals into ‘wise practitioners’. It is concluded that the existential implications of the COVID-19 pandemic, paradoxically, may direct many people’s awareness to a more sensitive, resonant, attitude towards the other. For some, this may produce a more humanized world and perception of others. Within this perspective the arts may help us to develop self-understanding and recognition of ‘the other’. Background: Besides handling the physical impacts of COVID-19 there is more than ever a need to understand what can help when mental health is challenged. Within this context our practical wisdom – our ability to understand and recognise when ‘the other’, for example the patient, is feeling lonely or anxious is particularly important. Aim: This article aims to contribute to the understanding of how the competence of health professionals may be advanced by helping them develop the self-understanding essential to being wise practitioners. Method: The article is based on a discussion informed by reflections (written in Danish and translated into English) by Masters students (and registered nurses) participating in a university programme “Patient and user focused nursing”. Findings: The first part of the article considers a student nurse’s reflection on understanding herself and one of her patients. The second part considers reflections on the contemporary world of change from a student nurse trying to engage with a world she experiences as falling apart. The third part addresses the impact of resonant places and encounters on developing self/other understandings; encounters that may also be produced through songs and lyrics. The final part draws conclusions on how it is possible to reach understandings of oneself and others as student health practitioners in time of a pandemic. Conclusion: In the process of developing understanding and recognition, competence built on self-understanding is central for helping form health professionals into ‘wise practitioners’. It is concluded that the existential implications of the COVID-19 pandemic, paradoxically, may direct many people’s awareness to a more sensitive, resonant, attitude towards the other. For some, this may produce a more humanized world and perception of others. Within this perspective the arts may help us develop self-understanding and recognition of ‘the other’.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kim Bloomfield; Carolin Kilian; Jakob Manthey; Jürgen Rehm; Julie Brummer; Ulrike Grittner;
    Country: Denmark

    <b><i>Introduction:</i></b> The year 2020 was marked by the COVID-19 pandemic. Policy responses to COVID-19 affected social and economic life and the availability of alcohol. Previous research has shown an overall small decrease in alcohol use in Denmark in the first months of the pandemic. The present paper focused on identifying which subgroups of individuals had decreased or increased their consumption. <b><i>Materials and Methods:</i></b> Data were collected between May and July 2020 (<i>n</i> = 2,566 respondents, convenience sample). Weights were applied to reflect the actual Danish general population. Variables included the pre-pandemic alcohol consumption, change in alcohol consumption in the past month, socio-demographics, and reported economic consequences. Responses to a single item assessing changes in alcohol consumption in the past month were classified as no change, increase, or decrease in consumption. Regression models investigated how changes in consumption were linked to pre-pandemic drinking levels, socio-demographics (gender, age groups, education), and reported economic consequences. <b><i>Results:</i></b> While 39% of participants reported decreased consumption levels and 34% had stable levels, 27% increased consumption. Characteristics associated with changes in consumption were associated with both increases and decreases in consumption: younger people, those with higher consumption levels before the pandemic, and those with lower education more often both reported increases as well as decreases in consumption. <b><i>Discussion/Conclusions:</i></b> We confirmed that more people decreased rather than increased their alcohol consumption in the first few months of the pandemic in Denmark. Characteristics associated with changes in consumption such as younger age, higher consumption levels, and lower education demonstrated a polarization of drinking since these were associated with both increases and decreases in consumption. Public health authorities should monitor alcohol use and other health behaviours for increased risks during the pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Julian Schuessler; Peter Thisted Dinesen; Søren Dinesen Østergaard; Kim Mannemar Sønderskov;
    Country: Denmark

    While billions have been vaccinated against COVID-19, unvaccinated citizens remain a challenge to public health given their higher likelihood of passing on the virus. One way for governments to reduce this concern is to enact more restrictive rules and regulations for the unvaccinated citizens in order to incentivize them to become vaccinated and/or reduce their spread of the virus. However, such rule differentiation conflicts with liberal principles of equal treatment, thereby raising a trade-off between material (public health) and principled concerns. To gain legitimacy in trading off these difficult concerns, governments are likely to look to preferences in the general population. We therefore analyze to what extent unequal treatment of the unvaccinated in terms of differentiation of various rules and regulations finds support among the general public. In a pre-registered survey experiment, we investigate public support for various COVID-19 regulations (e.g., test fees, isolation pay, and hospital prioritization). In the experiment, we randomly assign respondents to evaluate regulations that either (i) apply to adults in general or (ii) only to those adults who deliberately have chosen not to be vaccinated. This design provides a valid means to assess support for unequal treatment of the unvaccinated by minimizing various concerns relating to survey responding. Furthermore, we examine how these preferences vary by individual vaccination status, trust in institutions, as well as over-time changes in severity of the pandemic. We find significantly (both statistically and substantively) higher support for restrictive policies when targeted exclusively toward the unvaccinated, which we interpret as support for unequal treatment of this group. We also uncover strong polarization in these preferences between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated, but a much more limited role for trust and severity of the pandemic. While billions have been vaccinated against COVID-19, unvaccinated citizens remain a challenge to public health given their higher likelihood of passing on the virus. One way for governments to reduce this concern is to enact more restrictive rules and regulations for the unvaccinated citizens in order to incentivize them to become vaccinated and/or reduce their spread of the virus. However, such rule differentiation conflicts with liberal principles of equal treatment, thereby raising a trade-off between material (public health) and principled concerns. To gain legitimacy in trading off these difficult concerns, governments are likely to look to preferences in the general population. We therefore analyze to what extent unequal treatment of the unvaccinated in terms of differentiation of various rules and regulations finds support among the general public. In a pre-registered survey experiment, we investigate public support for various COVID-19 regulations (e.g., test fees, isolation pay, and hospital prioritization). In the experiment, we randomly assign respondents to evaluate regulations that either (i) apply to adults in general or (ii) only to those adults who deliberately have chosen not to be vaccinated. This design provides a valid means to assess support for unequal treatment of the unvaccinated by minimizing various concerns relating to survey responding. Furthermore, we examine how these preferences vary by individual vaccination status, trust in institutions, as well as over-time changes in severity of the pandemic. We find significantly (both statistically and substantively) higher support for restrictive policies when targeted exclusively toward the unvaccinated, which we interpret as support for unequal treatment of this group. We also uncover strong polarization in these preferences between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated, but a much more limited role for trust and severity of the pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thorup, Charlotte Brun; Spindler, Helle; Nøhr, Dorte; Skinbjerg, Hanne; Andreasen, Jan Jesper;
    Country: Denmark

    INTRODUCTION: Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused postponements of elective cardiac surgery. We hypothesised that postponements due to the pandemic were associated with higher levels of psychological distress than prepandemic postponements. METHODS: A prospective, observational cohort study was conducted among patients in whom elective cardiac surgery was postponed. Patients who received information regarding a new date of surgery prior to the pandemic were compared with patients postponed during the pandemic without information regarding a new date of surgery. Data were collected from patient records, validated questionnaires and interviews. RESULTS: Out of 55 postponed patients, 21 experienced prepandemic postponement. No significant differences were observed between groups regarding the psychological measures before their rescheduled operation. However, patients in both groups reported high levels of anxiety and depression with > 60% indicative of potentially positive diagnoses. No differences were found in mortality across groups and no patients developed severe complications. Interviews showed that patients in the COVID-19 group felt immediate relief at postponement and engaged in a meaning-making process with respect to their ability to tolerate postponement in order to reassure themselves and their relatives. CONCLUSIONS: No significant differences were found in psychological distress between the patients of the two groups. However, both groups experienced high levels of psychological distress. It remains unknown whether these results may be extrapolated to other surgical fields.none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.