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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
54 Research products, page 1 of 6

  • COVID-19
  • Closed Access
  • University of Southern Denmark Research Output
  • COVID-19

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  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Emma Heeno; Irmelin Biesenbach; Charlotte Englund; Martin Lund; Anja Toft; Lars Lund;
    Country: Denmark

    Objective: In March-April 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in Denmark, the Danish Health Authorities recommended that, where possible, face-to-face patient-physician consultations be replaced by telephone consultations. The aim of this study was to obtain patients’ evaluation of their telemedicine experience. Methods: Patients who were candidates for telemedicine consultations were recruited based on their urological ailment, necessity for follow-up and comorbidity. New referrals including patients with suspicion of cancer were not candidates for telemedicine. In total, 548 patients had their appointment altered during the period from 13 March to 30 April 2020. Postal questionnaires were sent to 548 patients and 300 (54.7%) replied. Results: In total, 280 patient answered, 224 (80%) men and 56 (20%) women, mean age 69 years (range 18–91) of whom 180 (64.3%) had a benign and 100 (35.7%) a malignant diagnosis. Twenty (6.7%) respondents did not remember their telephone consultation and were therefore excluded. Telephone consultation satisfaction was reported by 230 (85.0%) patients, but they would not prefer video consultations over telephone consultations, and only 102 (36.4%) would prefer telephone consultations in the future. Patients’ age, sex and distance to the hospital did not seem to be associated with telephone consultation satisfaction (age p = 0.17; sex p = 0.99; distance p = 0.27, respectively). In total, 226 (80.7%) were medically assessed as being at risk for COVID, but 74 (26.4%) subjectively evaluated themselves as being at risk. Conclusions: In general (85.0%), urological patients were satisfied with telephone consultations.

  • Closed Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Søndergaard, Jens;
    Country: Denmark

    During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, testing of suspected cases in Denmark has recently been limited to those who were critically ill. This has left an increasing number of unregistered infections in the society, obscured quantification and impacted lived lives. This case story reports a possible mild SARS-CoV-2 infection in a healthy young man in his twenties. Due to strategic guidelines, he was never tested for SARS-CoV-2, but the medical record was highly suspicious for infection. Besides the well-known symptoms of SARS-CoV-2, this case also reports total anosmia and ageusia.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    O'Hagan, John; Borowiecki, Karol J;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Denmark

    The approach of this chapter is polemical in nature, reflecting the very fluid situation that lies ahead for orchestras post COVID-19. The chapter has three main academic research objectives. First, to put the current debate in context, it looks at the key challenges that orchestras have faced since the turn of the last century and in what way COVID-19 posed new problems that impacted orchestral music. The second objective is to outline some special short-term measures introduced to mitigate the impact of COVID-19, namely: (i) the income-support measures needed to sustain orchestras; and (ii) the extent to which orchestras could come together and practice, and in fact perform, even if only in front of no or very limited live audiences. The third objective is to discuss what possibly lies ahead for live orchestral music, post-COVID-19, and in a rapidly changing world regarding technological advances in the production and consumption of orchestral music. To inform this discussion, some broad trends in the ‘consumption’ of orchestral music over time, particularly in terms of numbers attending live concerts and revenues from streamed concerts, are examined.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Closed Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Kolmos, Hans Jørn;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Bjørsum-Meyer; Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Gunnar Baatrup;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Denmark

    We read with interest a consensus statement of the ScotCap clinical leads collaboration reported by Macleod et al. on the use of Computer Tomography Colonography (CTC) and Colon Capsule Endoscopy (CCE) as promoted diagnostic modalities in the Covid-19 era and how to deal with diminutive and small polyps with a 'realistic medicine' approach (1). The issues discussed are important, and the suggestions made are essential to improve healthcare provision for patients, doctors, hospitals, and society. The number needed to colonoscope to find one significant neoplastic lesion has increased dramatically in recent years – in Denmark more than 4-fold in 15 years, whereas the number of cancers diagnosed has increased very modestly (20-30% in 15 years). In Europe alone, more than 12m colonoscopies are performed each year. Complications are primarily associated with therapeutic optical colonoscopies (OC); significant complications (bleeding, perforation and polypectomy syndrome) are seen in 0.7% and adding up to over 400.000 cases yearly (2).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shuquan He; Maria Elo; Xiaotian Zhang; Julia Zhang;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Denmark

    This chapter argues that China has been triple hit by the COVID-19 pandemic as it has caused a major trade shock, an investment shock and a business environment shock. To date, the globalized economies are interconnected by international trade, which makes trade an important vehicle for international contagion. Globalization and economic shocks are underpinned by a variety of forces affecting economic and societal changes creating a domino effect in global production networks. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on China’s overseas investment is manifold. Chinese businesses are exposed to the changing international business environment as perceptions on China’s roles are shifting. The COVID-19 pandemic is changing the way business is conducted worldwide. As a result, Chinese companies are now confronted with a new international business environment that is moving away from globalization that had been creating opportunities for firms from emerging economies to grow their presence in global markets.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
54 Research products, page 1 of 6
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Louise Redder; Sören Möller; Mary Ellen Jarden; Cl, Andersen; Henrik Frederiksen; Henrik Gregersen; Anja Klostergaard; Morten Saaby Steffensen; Per Trøllund Pedersen; Maja Hinge; +6 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Glintborg, B.; Jensen, D. V.; Engel, S.; Terslev, L.; Jensen, M. Pfeiffer; Hendricks, O.; Ostergaard, M.; Rasmussen, S. H.; Adelsten, T.; Danebod, K.; +11 more
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Emma Heeno; Irmelin Biesenbach; Charlotte Englund; Martin Lund; Anja Toft; Lars Lund;
    Country: Denmark

    Objective: In March-April 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in Denmark, the Danish Health Authorities recommended that, where possible, face-to-face patient-physician consultations be replaced by telephone consultations. The aim of this study was to obtain patients’ evaluation of their telemedicine experience. Methods: Patients who were candidates for telemedicine consultations were recruited based on their urological ailment, necessity for follow-up and comorbidity. New referrals including patients with suspicion of cancer were not candidates for telemedicine. In total, 548 patients had their appointment altered during the period from 13 March to 30 April 2020. Postal questionnaires were sent to 548 patients and 300 (54.7%) replied. Results: In total, 280 patient answered, 224 (80%) men and 56 (20%) women, mean age 69 years (range 18–91) of whom 180 (64.3%) had a benign and 100 (35.7%) a malignant diagnosis. Twenty (6.7%) respondents did not remember their telephone consultation and were therefore excluded. Telephone consultation satisfaction was reported by 230 (85.0%) patients, but they would not prefer video consultations over telephone consultations, and only 102 (36.4%) would prefer telephone consultations in the future. Patients’ age, sex and distance to the hospital did not seem to be associated with telephone consultation satisfaction (age p = 0.17; sex p = 0.99; distance p = 0.27, respectively). In total, 226 (80.7%) were medically assessed as being at risk for COVID, but 74 (26.4%) subjectively evaluated themselves as being at risk. Conclusions: In general (85.0%), urological patients were satisfied with telephone consultations.

  • Closed Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Søndergaard, Jens;
    Country: Denmark

    During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, testing of suspected cases in Denmark has recently been limited to those who were critically ill. This has left an increasing number of unregistered infections in the society, obscured quantification and impacted lived lives. This case story reports a possible mild SARS-CoV-2 infection in a healthy young man in his twenties. Due to strategic guidelines, he was never tested for SARS-CoV-2, but the medical record was highly suspicious for infection. Besides the well-known symptoms of SARS-CoV-2, this case also reports total anosmia and ageusia.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    O'Hagan, John; Borowiecki, Karol J;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Denmark

    The approach of this chapter is polemical in nature, reflecting the very fluid situation that lies ahead for orchestras post COVID-19. The chapter has three main academic research objectives. First, to put the current debate in context, it looks at the key challenges that orchestras have faced since the turn of the last century and in what way COVID-19 posed new problems that impacted orchestral music. The second objective is to outline some special short-term measures introduced to mitigate the impact of COVID-19, namely: (i) the income-support measures needed to sustain orchestras; and (ii) the extent to which orchestras could come together and practice, and in fact perform, even if only in front of no or very limited live audiences. The third objective is to discuss what possibly lies ahead for live orchestral music, post-COVID-19, and in a rapidly changing world regarding technological advances in the production and consumption of orchestral music. To inform this discussion, some broad trends in the ‘consumption’ of orchestral music over time, particularly in terms of numbers attending live concerts and revenues from streamed concerts, are examined.

  • Publication . Article . 2022
    Closed Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Kolmos, Hans Jørn;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shulzhenko, Elena; Secchi, Davide; Senderovitz, Martin; Hansen, Kristian Rune; van Bakel, Marian;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Bjørsum-Meyer; Anastasios Koulaouzidis; Gunnar Baatrup;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Denmark

    We read with interest a consensus statement of the ScotCap clinical leads collaboration reported by Macleod et al. on the use of Computer Tomography Colonography (CTC) and Colon Capsule Endoscopy (CCE) as promoted diagnostic modalities in the Covid-19 era and how to deal with diminutive and small polyps with a 'realistic medicine' approach (1). The issues discussed are important, and the suggestions made are essential to improve healthcare provision for patients, doctors, hospitals, and society. The number needed to colonoscope to find one significant neoplastic lesion has increased dramatically in recent years – in Denmark more than 4-fold in 15 years, whereas the number of cancers diagnosed has increased very modestly (20-30% in 15 years). In Europe alone, more than 12m colonoscopies are performed each year. Complications are primarily associated with therapeutic optical colonoscopies (OC); significant complications (bleeding, perforation and polypectomy syndrome) are seen in 0.7% and adding up to over 400.000 cases yearly (2).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Olesen, T. W.; Tyler, P. D.; Lassen, A. T.; Shapiro I, N.; Burke, R. C.; Wolfe, R. E.;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Shuquan He; Maria Elo; Xiaotian Zhang; Julia Zhang;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Denmark

    This chapter argues that China has been triple hit by the COVID-19 pandemic as it has caused a major trade shock, an investment shock and a business environment shock. To date, the globalized economies are interconnected by international trade, which makes trade an important vehicle for international contagion. Globalization and economic shocks are underpinned by a variety of forces affecting economic and societal changes creating a domino effect in global production networks. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on China’s overseas investment is manifold. Chinese businesses are exposed to the changing international business environment as perceptions on China’s roles are shifting. The COVID-19 pandemic is changing the way business is conducted worldwide. As a result, Chinese companies are now confronted with a new international business environment that is moving away from globalization that had been creating opportunities for firms from emerging economies to grow their presence in global markets.