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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
3,249 Research products, page 1 of 325

  • COVID-19
  • 2021-2021
  • CA
  • IE
  • English

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cristhian E. Scatularo; Juan Maria Farina; Ignacio Cigalini; Gonzalo Pérez; Fernando Wyss; Clara Saldarriaga; Adrian Baranchuk;
    Publisher: Permanyer

    Existe una clara relacion entre la infeccion por el nuevo coronavirus 2 y el diagnostico de enfermedad tromboembolica venosa, como consecuencia del desarrollo de un sindrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistemica debido a la activacion de la cascada de la coagulacion. Se presenta en el 90% de los pacientes con formas graves de la infeccion, lo que revela la presencia de microtrombosis y macrotrombosis intravascular pulmonar. Esto sugiere un posible beneficio clinico de la aplicacion de una tromboprofilaxis adecuada al riesgo clinico de cada paciente. Asimismo, la sospecha de enfermedad tromboembolica venosa en el contexto de esta pandemia representa un reto diagnostico debido a la existencia de similitudes entre ambas alteraciones en varios aspectos. Debe tenerse en cuenta que el diagnostico de tromboembolismo pulmonar agudo no excluye la posibilidad de infeccion viral. La valoracion de pacientes con sospecha de tromboembolismo pulmonar agudo en el contexto de la pandemia debe ser eficaz para establecer un diagnostico y tratamiento con rapidez, a fin de reducir la morbilidad y mortalidad adjuntas, sin que ello eleve el riesgo de infeccion para los profesionales de la salud y otros pacientes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Green, Caroline; Molloy, Owen; Duggan, Jim; Brennan, Caroline;
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
    Country: Ireland
    Project: EC | Respon-SEA-ble (652643)

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) is considered vital to the success of the United Nations¿ sustainable development goals. Systems thinking has been identified as a core competency that must be included in ESD. However, systems thinking-orientated ESD learning tools, established methods of the assessment of sustainability skills, and formal trials to demonstrate the effectiveness of such learning tools are all lacking. This research presents a randomised controlled trial (n = 106) to investigate whether an innovative online sustainability learning tool that incorporates two factors, systems thinking and system dynamics simulation, increases the understanding of a specific sustainability problem. A further aim was to investigate whether these factors also support the transfer of knowledge to a second problem with a similar systemic structure. The effects of the two factors were tested separately and in combination using a two-by-two factorial study design. ANOVA and related inferential statistical techniques were used to analyse the effect of the factors on sustainability understanding. Cohen¿s d effect sizes were also calculated. Simulation alone was found to increase ESD learning outcomes significantly, and also to support the transfer of skills, although less significantly. Qualitative feedback was also gathered from participants, most of whom reported finding systems thinking and simulation very helpful. This research was undertaken for the PhD studies of the corresponding author at the National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG) and was supported by funding from ResponSEAble (EU Horizon 2020 project number 652643), Ireland’s Higher Education Authority and Department of Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science (through the IT Investment Fund and ComputerDISC, and the COVID-19 Costed Extension), and the NUIG PhD Write-Up Bursary. peer-reviewed

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kennan, Danielle; Dolan, Pat; Anderson, Ella; Garrett, Kalem;
    Publisher: Routledge Taylor and Francis
    Country: Ireland

    This chapter reflects on how youth, through the medium of youth-led research, can seek to influence public policy by bringing a more democratic and informed youth perspective into the policy-making arena. The chapter details the Youth as Researchers Programme Model. It outlines how the programme has supported youth, in Ireland and internationally, to undertake social research projects with their peers on issues of concern, to collectively inform policy dialogue. The chapter documents the development of the programme, including a case study of one of the early youth-led research projects set up in Ireland in response to Ireland¿s National Child and Family Agency seeking to better understand how young people facing adversity can be heard and helped. It traces the programme¿s development from its inception to the present day, when the programme is now central to UNESCO¿s global response to inform policy on supporting youth during COVID-19. Not peer reviewed 2023-06-24

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Linke Yu; Mariah Lecompte; Weiguo Zhang; Peizhong Wang; Lixia Yang;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Project: CIHR

    The current study investigates the mental health condition of Mainland Chinese in Canada and identifies the associated sociodemographic and COVID-19-related predictors. A sample of 471 Mainland Chinese aged 18 or older completed an online survey that collected information on demographics, experience, cognition, and behaviours related to the COVID-19 pandemic and mental health condition. Mental health condition was assessed with the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) for the depression, anxiety, and stress levels of Mainland Chinese during the pandemic. Moderate to severe depression, anxiety, and stress levels were respectively reported by 11.30%, 10.83%, and 5.10% of respondents. Univariate analysis of variance models (ANOVAs) were conducted to assess mental health condition variance as stratified by independent sociodemographic- or COVID-19-related explanatory variables, to identify possible predictors to be entered into the subsequent regression models. The regression models identified age, income level, health status, and perceived discrimination as significant sociodemographic predictors (absolute value of βs = 1.19–7.11, ps < 0.05), whereas self-infection worry, attitude towards Canadian measures, information confusion, food/goods stocking, and room cleaning/sanitizing were identified as significant COVID-19-reltaed predictors (absolute value of βs = 1.33–3.45, ps < 0.05) for mental health outcomes. The results shed light on our understanding of the major factors associated with the mental health condition of Mainland Chinese in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hossein Aboutalebi; Maya Pavlova; Mohammad Javad Shafiee; Ali Sabri; Amer Alaref; Alexander Wong;
    Publisher: MDPI AG
    Project: NSERC

    Abstract The world is still struggling in controlling and containing the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The medical conditions associated with SARS-CoV-2 infections have resulted in a surge in the number of patients at clinics and hospitals, leading to a significantly increased strain on healthcare resources. As such, an important part of managing patients with SARS-CoV-2 infections within the clinical workflow is severity assessment, which is often conducted with the use of chest x-ray (CXR) images. In this work, we introduce COVID-Net CXR-S, a convolutional neural network for predicting the airspace severity of a SARS-CoV-2 positive patient based on a CXR image of the patient's chest. More specifically, we leveraged transfer learning to transfer representational knowledge gained from over 16,000 CXR images from a multinational cohort of over 15,000 patient cases into a custom network architecture for severity assessment. Experimental results with a multi-national patient cohort curated by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) RICORD initiative showed that the proposed COVID-Net CXR-S has potential to be a powerful tool for computer-aided severity assessment of CXR images of COVID-19 positive patients. Furthermore, radiologist validation on select cases by two board-certified radiologists with over 10 and 19 years of experience, respectively, showed consistency between radiologist interpretation and critical factors leveraged by COVID-Net CXR-S for severity assessment. While not a production-ready solution, the ultimate goal for the open source release of COVID-Net CXR-S is to act as a catalyst for clinical scientists, machine learning researchers, as well as citizen scientists to develop innovative new clinical decision support solutions for helping clinicians around the world manage the continuing pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Noof Aloufi; Zahraa Haidar; Jun Ding; Parameswaran Nair; Andrea Benedetti; David H. Eidelman; Imed-Eddine Gallouzi; Sergio Di Marco; Sabah N. Hussain; Carolyn J. Baglole;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Project: CIHR

    Patients with COPD may be at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 because of ACE2 upregulation, the entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke, the main risk factor for COPD, increases pulmonary ACE2. How ACE2 expression is controlled is not known but may involve HuR, an RNA binding protein that increases protein expression by stabilizing mRNA. We hypothesized that HuR would increase ACE2 protein expression. We analyzed scRNA-seq data to profile ELAVL1 expression in distinct respiratory cell populations in COVID-19 and COPD patients. HuR expression and cellular localization was evaluated in COPD lung tissue by multiplex immunohistochemistry and in human lung cells by imaging flow cytometry. The regulation of ACE2 expression was evaluated using siRNA-mediated knockdown of HuR. There is a significant positive correlation between ELAVL1 and ACE2 in COPD cells. HuR cytoplasmic localization is higher in smoker and COPD lung tissue; there were also higher levels of cleaved HuR (CP-1). HuR binds to ACE2 mRNA but knockdown of HuR does not change ACE2 protein levels in primary human lung fibroblasts (HLFs). Our work is the first to investigate the association between ACE2 and HuR. Further investigation is needed to understand the mechanistic underpinning behind the regulation of ACE2 expression.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Soronen, Anne; Talvitie-Lamberg, Karoliina;
    Publisher: York University
    Countries: Finland, Canada

    L’article explore l’écoute médiatisée du point de vue de l’intimité pendant les premières semaines de la pandémie de coronavirus. Le cadre théorique s’appuie sur la littérature, sur l’écoute et la présence dans des environnements médiatisés, l’engagement du public et l’intimité en tant que connexions significatives. Méthodologiquement, l’étude est une ethnographie connective, les données ont été collectées par autoethnographie collaborative. Nos données montrent que l’écoute était une stratégie de perception individuelle du monde extérieur et un moyen de former une connectivité. Le filetage entre différents écrans sur les plates-formes numériques a provoqué l’effondrement de contextes publics et privés et, à travers ces derniers, des types particuliers d’intimité sont apparus. Lorsque la position des mères universitaires est souvent celle d’une “connaisseuse”, la crise grave les oblige à rechercher de manières réceptives de savoir, comme une écoute attentive des autres. L’écoute est un moyen de former l’appartenance et la compréhension, mais à partir d’une position silencieuse. Cela suggère que nous devrions accorder plus d’attention aux présences silencieuses et aux publics, dans les environnements médiatisés contemporains. This article explores mediated listening from the perspective of intimacy during the first weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. The theoretical frame builds on the literature on listening and presence in mediated environments, audience engagement, and intimacy as meaningful connections. Methodologically, the study is connective ethnography, and the data was collected by collaborative autoethnography. Our data show that listening was an individual sensemaking strategy of the outside world and a means to form connectedness. Threading between different screens on digital platforms caused the collapse of public and private contexts, and through these, particular types of intimacy arose. When the position of academic mothers is often that of a ‘knower,’ the severe crisis compels them to look for receptive ways of knowing, such as careful listening of others. Listening is a means to form belonging and understanding, but from a silent position. We should pay more attention to the silent presences and audiences in contemporary mediated environments.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kim Snepvangers;
    Publisher: York University
    Country: Canada

    Ce projet, qui a débuté avec Prompt #2 du Massive Micro Sensemaking (MMS) dirigé par Annette Markham et Anne Harris de mai à juin 2020, m’a aidé à faire face à l’anxiété causée par le confinement de la COVID-19. J’ai mis en place quatre représentations visuelles - une série de photographies qui, à travers un processus de déploiement, établissent des liens avec des questionnements plus larges au cours de mes recherches d’archives dans le contexte de la colonisation de Sydney, en Australie. Explorer l’expérience vécue à travers la photographie prévoit un objectif a/r/tographique créatif, axé sur la représentation des objets afin qu’ils prennent un aspect plus que représentatif, touchant la matérialité des objets en tant que données. Adapter la superposition des rendus va au-delà de l’aspect dimensionnel en tant que simple capture d’un phénomène observé. Cette première photographie a ici une couche d’ombre supplémentaire pour créer du volume et recréer des semblants du monde figuratif à travers le reflet. This project, starting with Prompt 2 from the Massive Micro Sensemaking (MMS) led by Annette Markham and Anne Harris in May through June 2020, assisted me to move through the anxiety of COVID-19 lockdown. I set up four visual renderings—a series of photographs that, through a process of unfolding, make links to broader issues in my archival research in the context of settler colonial Sydney, Australia. Exploring lived experience through photography anticipates a creative a/r/tographic lens, focusing on rendering objects so that they take on a more-than-representational aspect, touching the materiality of objects as data. Adaptively layering the renderings moves beyond one dimensionality as a strict capturing of an observed phenomena. Here, an initial photograph has a latent, additional layer of shadow to build volume and re-cast semblances of the representational world through reflection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annette Markham;
    Publisher: York University
    Country: Canada

    Comment donner un sens à ce qui est à la fois global et granulaire ? Cet essai visuel explore la relation entre le macro et le micro à travers les pratiques quotidiennes de création, de recadrage et de partage d'images. Il pose la question de savoir si de nouveaux modes de connaissance émergent ou si des modèles de création de sens préexistent, un équivalent psychologique ou social des formes fractales dans la nature. Cela est particulièrement pertinent si l'on considère que c'est précisément dans les détails banals et les actions quotidiennes de création de sens que naissent les structures d'interprétation futures. Alors que l'on traverse une période traumatique à l'échelle du globe, l'essai s'interroge sur la façon dont ces micro-pratiques pourraient contribuer à renforcer ou à résister aux relations existantes entre les humains, les technologies et la planète. How do we make sense of the global and granular at the same time? This visual essay explores the relationship of the macro and micro through everyday practices of image making, cropping, and sharing. It asks whether new ways of knowing emerge or if perhaps patterns of sensemaking pre-exist, a psychological or social equivalent to fractals in nature. This becomes relevant when we consider that it is precisely within the mundane details of everyday actions of sensemaking that future structures are born. In wonders about how, in times of global trauma, might these micro practices reinforce or resist existing relations among humans, technologies, and the planet.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rebecca Carlson; Polina Golovátina-Mora; Corinna Peterken; Kim Snepvangers; Anne Soronen; Karoliina Talvitie-Lamberg;
    Countries: Canada, Finland

    Dans le contexte de l’épidémie de COVID-19, les auteurs de ce numéro spécial se sont réunis autour du projet de rédaction Massive Microscopic Sensemaking (MMS) au printemps 2020. Les articles de ce numéro viennent collectivement se confronter aux répercussions de la pandémie prolongée. Chaque article relate des expériences d’isolement social, d’adaptation et d’ouverture technologique en temps de crise sanitaire. Cette introduction décrit le raisonnement de ce numéro à la composition « patchwork » qui illustre une tentative de rupture avec les traditions académiques qui souvent ne réussissent pas à reconnaître la valeur émergente, et par conséquent incertaine, des travaux transdisciplinaires et collectifs. In the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, the authors in this special issue came together within the Massive Microscopic Sensemaking (MMS) writing project in the spring of 2020. Collectively grappling with the impact of the extended pandemic, each paper in this issue touches on experiences of social isolation, making do, and a technological reaching out under conditions of a public health crisis. This introduction describes the issue’s ‘patchwork’ development which reflects an attempt to break from traditions of academic scholarship that often fail to recognize the value of emergent, and therefore uncertain, cross-disciplinary and collective work.