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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
216 Research products, page 1 of 22

  • COVID-19
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Other ORP type
  • GB
  • DK
  • English

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pearson, Amelia; Mcphillips, Rebecca; Clarkson, Paul; Allen, Rosie; Robinson, Catherine;
    Publisher: International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols
    Country: United Kingdom

    The primary objective of this scoping review is to understand the extent and type of evidence in relation to moral injury in social work staff. The secondary objective is to establish how moral injury has been defined in the literature in the context of social work. The review question is: what is currently known about moral injury in social work staff?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fineberg, Naomi A; Menchón, José M; Hall, Natalie; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Brand, Matthias; Potenza, Marc N; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Cirnigliaro, Giovanna; Lochner, Christine; Billieux, Joël; +34 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Global concern about problematic usage of the internet (PUI), and its public health and societal costs, continues to grow, sharpened in focus under the privations of the COVID-19 pandemic. This narrative review reports the expert opinions of members of the largest international network of researchers on PUI in the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action (CA 16207), on the scientific progress made and the critical knowledge gaps remaining to be filled as the term of the Action reaches its conclusion. A key advance has been achieving consensus on the clinical definition of various forms of PUI. Based on the overarching public health principles of protecting individuals and the public from harm and promoting the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organisation has introduced several new structured diagnoses into the ICD-11, including gambling disorder, gaming disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour disorder, and other unspecified or specified disorders due to addictive behaviours, alongside naming online activity as a diagnostic specifier. These definitions provide for the first time a sound platform for developing systematic networked research into various forms of PUI at global scale. Progress has also been made in areas such as refining and simplifying some of the available assessment instruments, clarifying the underpinning brain-based and social determinants, and building more empirically based etiological models, as a basis for therapeutic intervention, alongside public engagement initiatives. However, important gaps in our knowledge remain to be tackled. Principal among these include a better understanding of the course and evolution of the PUI-related problems, across different age groups, genders and other specific vulnerable groups, reliable methods for early identification of individuals at risk (before PUI becomes disordered), efficacious preventative and therapeutic interventions and ethical health and social policy changes that adequately safeguard human digital rights. The paper concludes with recommendations for achievable research goals, based on longitudinal analysis of a large multinational cohort co-designed with public stakeholders. © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND licence. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, S; Duggan, P;
    Publisher: Emergency Planning Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    This Toolkit is a direct outcome of the research project ‘Social Distancing and Reimagining City Life: Performative strategies and practices for response and recovery in and beyond lockdown’ (AH/V013734/1). Available at the Emergency Planning Society website: https://the-eps.org/toolkit/. Personal debriefing is critical to emergency planning. In this Toolkit, we introduce creative strategies that offer new methods of engaging in personal debriefing, both for individuals and to support team approaches. We start from understanding emergency planning ‘as’ performance (as explored at our EPS Huddle, 30th March 2022 and in publications) to introduce and investigate performance processes as creative, flexible, and dynamic strategies for personal debriefing. Too often, creative practice is understood through finished artworks or performances, yet many of the processes that arts practitioners use in making work offer creative, individually-nuanced ways of making sense of events or situations. The Toolkit offers a range of strategies for personal debriefing that we have developed through our work with emergency and resilience planning professionals in the UK and USA. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation’s Covid-19 Rapid Response call.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wang, Ke; Goldenberg, Amit; Dorison, Charles A; Miller, Jeremy K; Uusberg, Andero; Lerner, Jennifer S; Gross, James J; Agesin, Bamikole Bamikole; Bernardo, Márcia; Campos, Olatz; +190 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands

    Correction to: Nature Human Behaviour https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-021-01173-x, published online 2 August 2021. In the version of this article initially published, the following authors were omitted from the author list and the Author contributionssection for “investigation” and “writing and editing”: Nandor Hajdu (Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest,Hungary), Jordane Boudesseul (Facultad de Psicología, Instituto de Investigación Científica, Universidad de Lima, Lima, Perú), RafałMuda (Faculty of Economics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland) and Sandersan Onie (Black Dog Institute, UNSWSydney, Sydney, Australia & Emotional Health for All Foundation, Jakarta, Indonesia). In addition, Saeideh FatahModares’ name wasoriginally misspelled as Saiedeh FatahModarres in the author list. Further, affiliations have been corrected for Maria Terskova (NationalResearch University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia), Susana Ruiz Fernandez (FOM University of Applied Sciences,Essen; Leibniz-Institut fur Wissensmedien, Tubingen, and LEAD Research Network, Eberhard Karls University, Tubingen, Germany),Hendrik Godbersen (FOM University of Applied Sciences, Essen, Germany), Gulnaz Anjum (Department of Psychology, Simon FraserUniversity, Burnaby, Canada, and Department of Economics & Social Sciences, Institute of Business Administration, Karachi, Pakistan).

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elston, T;
    Publisher: UK in a Changing Europe
    Country: United Kingdom

    Resilience, the ability to maintain functioning during sudden and severe adversity, is a critical requirement of public services. Brexit and Covid-19 tested government’s resilience, and necessitated some undesirable trade-offs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lennox, Charlotte;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dr Charlotte Lennox from the University of Manchester illustrates the health challenges for children in custodial settings and highlights a research project designed to develop health improvements and policy recommendations for future major incidents/pandemics

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Hall, Alex; Harris, Danielle; Littlewood, Alison; Mcdermott, Jane; Money, Annemarie; Todd, Chris;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Duch, R; Asiedu, E; Nakamura, R; Rouyard, T; Yevenes, C; Roope, L; Violato, M; Clarke, P;
    Publisher: Springer Nature
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    John, P; McAndrews, J; Loewen, PJ; Banerjee, S; Savani, M; Koenig, R; Nyhan, B; Lee-Whiting, B;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © The authors. Overcoming Barriers to Vaccination By Empowering Citizens to Make Deliberate Choices is one of ten in-depth transatlantic reports published by The British Academy exploring COVID-19 vaccine engagement in the UK and the US. For more details, see: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/. British Academy (COVG7210005); Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Madhi, SA; Ihekweazu, C; Rees, H; Pollard, AJ;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
216 Research products, page 1 of 22
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pearson, Amelia; Mcphillips, Rebecca; Clarkson, Paul; Allen, Rosie; Robinson, Catherine;
    Publisher: International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols
    Country: United Kingdom

    The primary objective of this scoping review is to understand the extent and type of evidence in relation to moral injury in social work staff. The secondary objective is to establish how moral injury has been defined in the literature in the context of social work. The review question is: what is currently known about moral injury in social work staff?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fineberg, Naomi A; Menchón, José M; Hall, Natalie; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Brand, Matthias; Potenza, Marc N; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Cirnigliaro, Giovanna; Lochner, Christine; Billieux, Joël; +34 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United Kingdom

    Global concern about problematic usage of the internet (PUI), and its public health and societal costs, continues to grow, sharpened in focus under the privations of the COVID-19 pandemic. This narrative review reports the expert opinions of members of the largest international network of researchers on PUI in the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action (CA 16207), on the scientific progress made and the critical knowledge gaps remaining to be filled as the term of the Action reaches its conclusion. A key advance has been achieving consensus on the clinical definition of various forms of PUI. Based on the overarching public health principles of protecting individuals and the public from harm and promoting the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organisation has introduced several new structured diagnoses into the ICD-11, including gambling disorder, gaming disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour disorder, and other unspecified or specified disorders due to addictive behaviours, alongside naming online activity as a diagnostic specifier. These definitions provide for the first time a sound platform for developing systematic networked research into various forms of PUI at global scale. Progress has also been made in areas such as refining and simplifying some of the available assessment instruments, clarifying the underpinning brain-based and social determinants, and building more empirically based etiological models, as a basis for therapeutic intervention, alongside public engagement initiatives. However, important gaps in our knowledge remain to be tackled. Principal among these include a better understanding of the course and evolution of the PUI-related problems, across different age groups, genders and other specific vulnerable groups, reliable methods for early identification of individuals at risk (before PUI becomes disordered), efficacious preventative and therapeutic interventions and ethical health and social policy changes that adequately safeguard human digital rights. The paper concludes with recommendations for achievable research goals, based on longitudinal analysis of a large multinational cohort co-designed with public stakeholders. © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND licence. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Peer reviewed

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, S; Duggan, P;
    Publisher: Emergency Planning Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    This Toolkit is a direct outcome of the research project ‘Social Distancing and Reimagining City Life: Performative strategies and practices for response and recovery in and beyond lockdown’ (AH/V013734/1). Available at the Emergency Planning Society website: https://the-eps.org/toolkit/. Personal debriefing is critical to emergency planning. In this Toolkit, we introduce creative strategies that offer new methods of engaging in personal debriefing, both for individuals and to support team approaches. We start from understanding emergency planning ‘as’ performance (as explored at our EPS Huddle, 30th March 2022 and in publications) to introduce and investigate performance processes as creative, flexible, and dynamic strategies for personal debriefing. Too often, creative practice is understood through finished artworks or performances, yet many of the processes that arts practitioners use in making work offer creative, individually-nuanced ways of making sense of events or situations. The Toolkit offers a range of strategies for personal debriefing that we have developed through our work with emergency and resilience planning professionals in the UK and USA. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation’s Covid-19 Rapid Response call.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wang, Ke; Goldenberg, Amit; Dorison, Charles A; Miller, Jeremy K; Uusberg, Andero; Lerner, Jennifer S; Gross, James J; Agesin, Bamikole Bamikole; Bernardo, Márcia; Campos, Olatz; +190 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands

    Correction to: Nature Human Behaviour https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-021-01173-x, published online 2 August 2021. In the version of this article initially published, the following authors were omitted from the author list and the Author contributionssection for “investigation” and “writing and editing”: Nandor Hajdu (Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest,Hungary), Jordane Boudesseul (Facultad de Psicología, Instituto de Investigación Científica, Universidad de Lima, Lima, Perú), RafałMuda (Faculty of Economics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland) and Sandersan Onie (Black Dog Institute, UNSWSydney, Sydney, Australia & Emotional Health for All Foundation, Jakarta, Indonesia). In addition, Saeideh FatahModares’ name wasoriginally misspelled as Saiedeh FatahModarres in the author list. Further, affiliations have been corrected for Maria Terskova (NationalResearch University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia), Susana Ruiz Fernandez (FOM University of Applied Sciences,Essen; Leibniz-Institut fur Wissensmedien, Tubingen, and LEAD Research Network, Eberhard Karls University, Tubingen, Germany),Hendrik Godbersen (FOM University of Applied Sciences, Essen, Germany), Gulnaz Anjum (Department of Psychology, Simon FraserUniversity, Burnaby, Canada, and Department of Economics & Social Sciences, Institute of Business Administration, Karachi, Pakistan).

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elston, T;
    Publisher: UK in a Changing Europe
    Country: United Kingdom

    Resilience, the ability to maintain functioning during sudden and severe adversity, is a critical requirement of public services. Brexit and Covid-19 tested government’s resilience, and necessitated some undesirable trade-offs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lennox, Charlotte;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dr Charlotte Lennox from the University of Manchester illustrates the health challenges for children in custodial settings and highlights a research project designed to develop health improvements and policy recommendations for future major incidents/pandemics

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Hall, Alex; Harris, Danielle; Littlewood, Alison; Mcdermott, Jane; Money, Annemarie; Todd, Chris;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Duch, R; Asiedu, E; Nakamura, R; Rouyard, T; Yevenes, C; Roope, L; Violato, M; Clarke, P;
    Publisher: Springer Nature
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    John, P; McAndrews, J; Loewen, PJ; Banerjee, S; Savani, M; Koenig, R; Nyhan, B; Lee-Whiting, B;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © The authors. Overcoming Barriers to Vaccination By Empowering Citizens to Make Deliberate Choices is one of ten in-depth transatlantic reports published by The British Academy exploring COVID-19 vaccine engagement in the UK and the US. For more details, see: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/. British Academy (COVG7210005); Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Madhi, SA; Ihekweazu, C; Rees, H; Pollard, AJ;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom