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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,365 Research products, page 1 of 437

  • COVID-19
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • Conference object
  • COVID-19
  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Abraham Ninian Ejin; Hoe Tung Yew; Mazlina Mamat; Farrah Wong; Ali Chekima; Seng Kheau Chung;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    <span lang="EN-US">The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has led to many infected worldwide and has become a global crisis. COVID-19 manifests in the form of shortness of breath, coughing and fever. More people are getting infected and healthcare systems worldwide are overwhelmed as healthcare workers become exhausted and infected. Thus, remote monitoring for COVID-19 patients is required. An internet of things (IoT) based real-time health monitoring system for COVID-19 patients was proposed. It features monitoring of five physiological parameters, namely electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SpO2) and body temperature. These vitals are processed by the main controller and transmitted to the cloud for storage. Healthcare professionals can read real-time patient vitals on the web-based dashboard which is equipped with an alert service. The proposed system was able to transmit and display all parameters in real-time accurately without any packet loss or transmission errors. The accuracy of body temperature readings, RR, SpO2 and HR, is up to 99.7%, 100%, 97.97% and 98.34%, respectively. Alerts were successfully sent when the parameters reached unsafe levels. With the proposed system, healthcare professionals can remotely monitor COVID-19 patients with greater ease, lessen their exposure to the pathogen, and improve patient monitoring.</span>

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vér, András; McKee, Annie; Moriarty, John; Honegger, Sandra; O'Dwyer, Tom;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | NEFERTITI (772705)

    NEFERTITI is a ‘Horizon 2020’ project that will run until the end of 2021. It supports on-farm demonstration activities and farmer-to-farmer learning that supports innovation uptake. The name NEFERTITI reflects the full project title: ‘Networking European Farms to Enhance Cross Fertilisation and Innovation Uptake Through Demonstration’. Networking... The project involves ten networks each with a theme. The themes focus on aspects of innovation in livestock production, arable farming, and horticulture. They bring together 45 regional clusters (‘hubs’) of demonstration farmers and people who innovate in agriculture, such as advisors, facilitators, researchers, industry representatives and policy makers. You can Farm: Farm attractiveness Network 10, called ‘Farm Attractiveness’ has the goal of identifying and supporting new people and new pathways into agriculture across Europe. This network supports knowledge exchange demonstration events held on farms and online, with host farmers who are ‘new entrants’ to agriculture. The objective of the demonstration events are to encourage young people to see farming as a future and career that is both worthwhile and worth considering. Network Activities In 2019 a total of 39 events were organised by Network 10 hubs, all of which were either on-farm or in-organisation. In 2020, 31 events were held, 12 of which were held online in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Online events organised included webinars, panel discussions, and social media ‘takeovers’. One UK virtual event included contributions from four partner countries. The use of social media was critical to the success of the demonstration events, both on-farm, in organisation, or held online. Social media promotion of events attracted young and diverse audiences, and careful use of different platforms appealed to different localities and types of participants (e.g. agricultural college students). For example, the social media ‘takeovers’ involved young farmers directly uploading stories, videos, pictures, and other content to the social media of partner organisations. Videos from the events could be shared via social media to enhance knowledge exchange and links were made available to allow for later viewing. Findings Multimedia use and the use of diverse social media platforms has the potential increase and target audiences. E.g. Instagram events, targeted at young people, also promoted on Facebook and Twitter, including sharing video links. Virtual events have enabled an international dimension to be added to events. E.g. UK webinar featuring contributions from other partners Online events are available for knowledge exchange with those who cannot participate ‘live’. E.g. Webinar recordings are available on YouTube and Instagram highlights of social media takeovers are available on the host channel, and Instagram TV.

  • Open Access Spanish
    Authors: 
    Santamarina Campos, Ana;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Como en cualquier proyecto de comunicación, el primer paso de todo el proceso ha de ser definir claramente tu público, las personas y entidades a las que, al final de todo el proceso de elaboración y edición, quieres dirigirte… en decir: tus audiencias. Una memoria anual tiene un número de audiencias más amplio que el de los documentos de difusión de información (disclosure) habituales. ¿Cuántas y cuáles son esas audiencias? Por decirlo en cuatro palabras: tus grupos de interés (los famosísimos stakeholder).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David Christian Rose; Faye Shortland; Jilly Hall; Paul Hurley; Ruth Little; Caroline Nye; Matt Lobley;
    Publisher: Taylor and Francis
    Country: United Kingdom

    Objectives In this paper, we use a UK case study to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the mental health (emotional, psychological, social wellbeing) of farmers. We outline the drivers of poor farming mental health, the manifold impacts of the pandemic at a time of policy and environmental change, and identify lessons that can be learned to develop resilience in farming communities against future shocks. Methods We undertook a survey answered by 207 farmers across the UK, focusing on drivers of poor mental health and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. We also conducted 22 in-depth interviews with individuals in England, Scotland and Wales who provide mental health support to farmers. These explored how and why the COVID-19 pandemic affected the mental health of farmers. These interviews were supplemented by 93 survey responses from a similar group of support providers (UK-wide). Results We found that the pandemic exacerbated underlying drivers of poor mental health and wellbeing in farming communities. 67% of farmers surveyed reported feeling more stressed, 63% felt more anxious, 38% felt more depressed, and 12% felt more suicidal. The primary drivers of poor mental health identified by farmers during the pandemic were decreased social contact, issues with the general public on private land, and moving online for social events. Support providers also highlighted relationship and financial issues, illness, and government inspections as drivers of poor mental health. Some farmers, conversely, outlined positive impacts of the pandemic. Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic is just one of many potential stressors associated with poor farming mental health and its impacts are likely to be long lasting and delayed. Multiple stressors affecting farmers at the same time can create a tipping point. Therefore, there is a need for long-term support and ongoing evaluation of the drivers of poor mental health in farming families.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Radeef Chundakkadan; Elizabeth Nedumparambil;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Abstract The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we investigate the nexus between investor attention to COVID-19 and daily returns in 59 countries. We use Google Search Volume Index to account for investor attention. Our empirical findings suggest that the search volume of the pandemic is negatively associated with daily returns. The effect was strong in the week that the World Health Organization declared it as pandemic and among advanced countries. Second, we explore the relationship between search volume and market volatility. The findings suggest that COVID-19 sentiment generated excess volatility in the market. Our findings remain robust with alternative specifications.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Afni Zukifli;
    Publisher: Research, Development and Innovation Agency, Ministry of Environment and Forestry

    The coronavirus outbreak (COVID-19) has raised questions about changes in subsequent environmental effects, mainly forest and land fires. This paper evaluates the implementation of land and forest fire management policies in Indonesia during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in 2020. A qualitative approach was conducted in policy implementation analysis based on George Edward III's theory by looking at bureaucratic structure, resources, communication, and disposition factors. The research focused on the operational work of the Forest and Land Fire Brigade, known as Manggala Agni, in Indonesia. The results showed that the collaborative work of Manggala Agni and the other forest and land fire task forces successfully reduced the hotspots; hence there was a significant decrease in the burned area. It is also inseparable from climatic factors. During this period there was no haze disaster although the task of controlling forest and land fires still encountered several obstacles during the pandemic. This is because of training, technology transfer, budget support, and synergy between stakeholders and Manggala Agni’s team members, so a significant reduction in forest and land fires during 2020 can be achieved.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Izhangghani; Hikmah, Irmayatul; Slamet Indriyanto;
    Publisher: Ikatan Ahli Informatika Indonesia (IAII)

    After people died from infections during the COVID-19 epidemic, this attracted a lot of attention. COVID-19 causes symptoms such as fever, headache, sore throat, shortness of breath, and others. Many deaths are asymptomatic, which makes the problem even bigger. Therefore, real-time system monitoring is needed. Monitoring will be carried out about measuring body temperature and oxygen saturation in patients. Monitoring body temperature is necessary because it can detect symptoms of COVID-19 in patients earlier. The concept of the Internet of Things (IoT) is to enable devices to send and receive data over an internet network. The monitoring system to be built uses NodeMCU ESP8266, DS18B20 sensor, and MAX30100 sensor. Data communication is used in the exchange of information using WiFi. Applications made using MIT App Inventor are used to view body temperature and oxygen saturation data. This system is expected to reduce the number of deaths due to COVID-19. DS18B20 sensor has a sensor accuracy of 99,73% and an average error of 0,27%. MAX30100 sensor has an accuracy rate of 99,18% and an average error of 0,82%. Delay test results show an average of 155,57 ms, and packet loss test results show an average of 0%. The result of a system that has been tested said that both sensors can read well. After people died from infections during COVID-19 epidemic, this attracted a lot of attention. COVID-19 causes symptoms such as fever, headache, sore throat, shortness of breath, and others. Many deaths are asymptomatic, which it makes the problem even bigger. Therefore, real-time system monitoring is needed. Monitoring will be carried out about measuring body temperature and oxygen saturation in patients. Monitoring body temperature is necessary because it can detect symptoms of COVID-19 in patients earlier. Concept of Internet of Things (IoT) is to enable devices to send and receive data over internet network. Monitoring system to be built uses NodeMCU ESP8266, DS18B20 sensor, and MAX30100 sensor. Data communication is used in exchange of information using WiFi. Applications made using MIT App Inventor are used to view body temperature and oxygen saturation data. This system is expected to reduce number of deaths due to COVID-19. DS18B20 sensor has a sensor accuracy of 99,73% and an average error of 0,27%. MAX30100 sensor has an accuracy rate of 99,18% and an average error of 0,82%. Delay test results show an average of 155,57 ms, and packet loss test results show an average of 0%. Result of system that has been tested said the both sensors can read well.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Luis Gregorio Abad Espinoza;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; The outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 has threatened ethnographic inquiry, undermining its quintessential characteristic. Participant observation, then, has been thoroughly dismembered by the radical measures implemented to prevent the spread of the virus. This phenomenon, in short, has dragged anthropologists to a liminal state within which ethnography is paradoxically caught in an onto-epistemological unstable vortex. The question of being here and not there, during the pandemic, is epitomised in the instability of different spatio-temporal contexts that overlap through technological mediations. Reflecting on previous fieldwork experiences and current virtual inquiries with the Shuar of the Ecuadorian Amazon unfolds how COVID-19 has thoroughly reshaped how the author approaches subjects' socio-ecological settings. Against this background, the article argues that corporeal immersion remains a necessary condition for the anthropological scrutiny of multispecies relationalities amidst the challenging times of the Anthropocene. The article nevertheless demonstrates that the intellectual efforts to grasp the different material temporalities of virtual spaces embrace the ethical principles concerning the renunciation of fieldwork with vulnerable communities. Furthermore, a reflective and speculative stance is proposed to actualise the snapshots of faraway physicalities linking them to past embodied and multi-sensory experiences. It is ultimately theorised how these mnemonic devices operate as creative forms of inquiry that overcome the pandemic consequences, extra-stimulating our cognitive capabilities to reflect on prior and possible socio-material interactions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Battisti, Enrico; Alfiero, Simona; Leonidou, Erasmia;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Cyprus

    Digital and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and, consequently, remote working have increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, workers' economic-financial perception of remote working conditions, such as digital technology and its implementation, has scarcely been researched. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the economic-financial impacts of remote working on labourers. Using a mixed-methods sequential exploratory design, a sample of 976 workers is investigated. This study highlights that the majority of workers experience a negative economic-financial impact due to the additional costs incurred for digital technology and platforms and for utilities as well as the non-payment of overtime and meal vouchers, which are higher than the savings in commuting costs and out-of-pocket expenses. Furthermore, this research emphasizes that psychological-behavioural variables, specifically job satisfaction and technostress, are essential in the choice to continue working remotely after the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, our results have important theoretical implications related to the existing literature both on the managerial issues connected to digital transformation, with interdisciplinary elements linked to psychological aspects, and on corporate finance topics associated to the economic-financial impacts of remote working.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kaiser, Verena; Maisch, Bettina;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Wenn der Corona-Pandemie etwas Positives abzugewinnen ist, dann sind es die neuen digitalen Lehrformate, die wir Hochschullehrer und -lehrerinnen ausprobieren durften. Nun können wir die vielversprechendsten Aspekte beibehalten und mit bewährten Methoden verknüpfen. If there was anything positive with regards to the covid-19 pandemic, it is that we as university lecturers were able to try out a series of new digital teaching experiences. Now it is time to combine the most promising aspects of virtual teaching with onsite learning.