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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
61 Research products, page 1 of 7

  • COVID-19
  • 2013-2022
  • Closed Access
  • Other ORP type
  • NL
  • English
  • COVID-19

10
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  • Closed Access English
    Country: Netherlands

    Background Early reports on the pandemic nature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) directed the nephrology community to develop infection prevention and control (IPC) guidance. We aimed to make an inventory of strategies that dialysis centres followed to prevent infection with COVID-19 in the first pandemic wave. Methods We analyzed IPC measures taken by hemodialysis centres treating patients presenting with COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 31 July 2020 and that completed the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database centre questionnaire. Additionally, we made an inventory of guidelines published in European countries to prevent spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in dialysis centres. Results Data from 73 dialysis units located in and bordering Europe were analyzed. All participating centres implemented IPC measures to mitigate the impact of SARS-CoV-2 during the first pandemic wave. Measures mentioned most often included triage with questions before entering the dialysis ward, measuring body temperature, hand disinfection, masking for all patients and staff, and personal protective equipment for staff members. These measures were also recommended in most of the 14 guidelines that were identified in the inventory of national guidelines and were also scored as being among the most important measures by the authors of this paper. Heterogeneity existed between centres and national guidelines regarding the minimal distance between dialysis chairs and recommendations regarding isolation and cohorting. Conclusions Although variation existed, measures to prevent transmission of SARS-CoV-2 were relatively similar across centres and national guidelines. Further research is needed to assess causal relationships between measures taken and spread of SARS-CoV-2.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Onţanu, Elena Alina; Velicogna, Marco;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Tomris, Ilhan; Unione, Luca; Nguyen, Linh; Zaree, Pouya; Bouwman, Kim M; Liu, Lin; Li, Zeshi; Fok, Jelle A; Ríos Carrasco, María; van der Woude, Roosmarijn; +15 more
    Publisher: bioRxiv
    Country: Netherlands

    SARS-CoV-2 viruses engage ACE2 as a functional receptor with their spike protein. The S1 domain of the spike protein contains a C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) and an N-terminal domain (NTD). The NTD of other coronaviruses includes a glycan-binding cleft. However, for the SARS-CoV-2 NTD protein-glycan binding was only observed weakly for sialic acids with highly sensitive methods. Amino acid changes in the NTD of Variants of Concern (VoC) shows antigenic pressure, which can be an indication of NTD-mediated receptor binding. Trimeric NTD proteins of SARS-CoV-2, Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron did not reveal a receptor binding capability. Unexpectedly, the SARS-CoV-2 Beta subvariant strain (501Y.V2-1) NTD binding to Vero E6 cells was sensitive to sialidase pretreatment. Glycan microarray analyses identified a putative 9- O -acetylated sialic acid as a ligand, which was confirmed by catch-and-release ESI-MS, STD-NMR analyses, and a graphene-based electrochemical sensor. The Beta (501Y.V2-1) variant attained an enhanced glycan binding modality in the NTD with specificity towards 9- O -acetylated structures, suggesting a dual-receptor functionality of the SARS-CoV-2 S1 domain, which was quickly selected against. These results indicate that SARS-CoV-2 can probe additional evolutionary space, allowing binding to glycan receptors on the surface of target cells. Graphical abstract: Synopsis: Coronaviruses utilize their N-terminal domain (NTD) for initial reversible low-affinity interaction to (sialylated) glycans. This initial low-affinity/high-avidity engagement enables viral surfing on the target membrane, potentially followed by a stronger secondary receptor interaction. Several coronaviruses, such as HKU1 and OC43, possess a hemagglutinin-esterase for viral release after sialic acid interaction, thus allowing viral dissemination. Other coronaviruses, such as MERS-CoV, do not possess a hemagglutinin-esterase, but interact reversibly to sialic acids allowing for viral surfing and dissemination. The early 501Y.V2-1 subvariant of the Beta SARS-CoV-2 Variant of Concern has attained a receptor-binding functionality towards 9- O -acetylated sialic acid using its NTD. This binding functionality was selected against rapidly, most likely due to poor dissemination. Ablation of sialic acid binding in more recent SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern suggests a fine balance of sialic acid interaction of SARS-CoV-2 is required for infection and/or transmission.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sharma, Parvarish; Dhanjal, Daljeet Singh; Chopra, Chirag; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; van der Spek, Peter J.; Sharma, Hari S.; Satija, Saurabh;
    Country: Netherlands

    Asthma, COPD, COVID-19, EGPA, Lung cancer, and Pneumonia are major chronic respiratory diseases (or CRDs) affecting millions worldwide and account for substantial morbidity and mortality. These CRDs are irreversible diseases that affect different parts of the respiratory system, imposing a considerable burden on different socio-economic classes. All these CRDs have been linked to increased eosinophils in the lungs. Eosinophils are essential immune mediators that contribute to tissue homeostasis and the pathophysiology of various diseases. Interestingly, elevated eosinophil level is associated with cellular processes that regulate airway hyperresponsiveness, airway remodeling, mucus hypersecretion, and inflammation in the lung. Therefore, eosinophil is considered the therapeutic target in eosinophil-mediated lung diseases. Although, conventional medicines like antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and bronchodilators are available to prevent CRDs. But the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents after long-term usage remains a challenge. However, progressive development in nanotechnology has unveiled the targeted nanocarrier approach that can significantly improve the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic drug. The potential of the nanocarrier system can be specifically targeted on eosinophils and their associated components to obtain promising results in the pharmacotherapy of CRDs. This review intends to provide knowledge about eosinophils and their role in CRDs. Moreover, it also discusses nanocarrier drug delivery systems for the targeted treatment of CRDs.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Kelder, J.M.;
    Country: Netherlands

    From an Ancient Egyptian plague to the Black Death and Spanish flu, epidemics have often spurred societal transformations. Understanding why can help us create a better world after covid-19

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    GORDON, A.L.; SPILSBURY, K.; Achterberg, W.P.; ADAMS, R.; JONES, L.; GOODMAN, C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Long-term care homes play an essential role within health and social care. Successful measures to support older people at home for longer have led to increased prevalence of disability, frailty and cognitive impairment in those who live in care homes over the last two decades. The need for care home places is projected to increase for the next two decades. Modern care homes provide care for people who are predominantly over 80, have multiple long-term conditions, take multiple medicines, are physically dependent and live with cognitive impairment. Residents do better when services recognise the contributions of staff and care home providers rather than treating residents as individual patients living in a communal setting. There is a strong case given residents' frailty, multimorbidity and disability, that care should be structured around Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). Care should be designed to allow opportunities for multiprofessional teams to come together for CGA, particularly if healthcare professionals are based outside care homes. Good data about care homes and residents are central to efforts to deliver high quality care-in some countries, these data are collected but not collated. Collating such data is a priority. Care home staff are under-recognised and underpaid-parity of pay and opportunity with NHS staff is the bare minimum to ensure that the best are recruited and retained in the sector. During the COVID-19 pandemic, residents and relatives have frequently been left out of decisions about policies that affect them, and better consultation is needed to deliver high quality care.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Brasil Varandas Pinto, A.L.; Eum, S.; Klippe, W. van de; Rafols Garcia, I.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Orchard, Christa; Smith, Peter M; Kromhout, Hans; IRAS OH Epidemiology Chemical Agents; dIRAS RA-2;
    Country: Netherlands

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted productivity of female academics in the field of occupational and environmental health, by examining trends in male and female authorship of submissions during and prior to the COVID-19 pandemic in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. METHODS: Administrative data on submissions between January 2017 and November 2021 were obtained through databases held at BMJ journals. Author gender was identified using an existing algorithm based on matching names to social media accounts. The number and proportion of female and male primary (first) and senior (last) authors were examined for each quarter, and the average change in share of monthly submissions from male authors in the months since the pandemic compared with corresponding months prior to the pandemic were identified using regression models estimating least squares means. RESULTS: Among 2286 (64.7%) and 2335 (66.1%) manuscripts for which first and last author gender were identified, respectively, 49.3% of prepandemic submissions were from male first authors, increasing to 55.4% in the first year of the pandemic (difference of 6.1%, 95% CI 1.3% to 10.7%), before dropping to 46.6% from April 2021 onwards. Quarterly counts identified a large increase in submissions from male authors during the first year after the onset of the pandemic, and a smaller increase from female authors. The proportion of male last authors did not change significantly during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that there has been an increase in male productivity during the COVID-19 pandemic within the field of occupational and environmental health research that is present to a lesser extent among women.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Becker, C.; Achterberg, W.;
    Country: Netherlands

    The sustainability of healthcare of older people in Europe is at stake. Many experts currently focus on the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. But there are other elements coming up that might even have a greater impact. Healthcare systems, geriatric care and geriatric rehabilitation in particular, will face disruptive changes due to both demographic demand and a shortage of human and financial resources. This decade will be transformed by a high proportion of the older health workforce transitioning to retirement. This expertise must be retained. The brain drain of health care workers migrating from Eastern parts to Western Europe is diminishing. Discussing and deciding upon the priorities of value-based health care for older people such as equity and access is required. The acute healthcare sector in most countries focuses on fee-for-service models instead of building systemic approaches to maximise independence and autonomy of older citizens. In this commentary, we build on recent book chapters and articles on geriatric rehabililtation. Our main questions for the anniversary edition of Age and Ageing is what it is that geriatric rehabilitation could, should and must contribute in the roaring 2020s?

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Country: Netherlands

    After two years of COVID-19 we all know that communicating through a flat screen is exhausting. Since long before that, professor Pablo Cesar has been focussing his research on highly realistic volumetric video conferencing which will allow smooth, natural, communication and collaboration – making remoteness a thing of the past.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
61 Research products, page 1 of 7
  • Closed Access English
    Country: Netherlands

    Background Early reports on the pandemic nature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) directed the nephrology community to develop infection prevention and control (IPC) guidance. We aimed to make an inventory of strategies that dialysis centres followed to prevent infection with COVID-19 in the first pandemic wave. Methods We analyzed IPC measures taken by hemodialysis centres treating patients presenting with COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 31 July 2020 and that completed the European Renal Association COVID-19 Database centre questionnaire. Additionally, we made an inventory of guidelines published in European countries to prevent spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in dialysis centres. Results Data from 73 dialysis units located in and bordering Europe were analyzed. All participating centres implemented IPC measures to mitigate the impact of SARS-CoV-2 during the first pandemic wave. Measures mentioned most often included triage with questions before entering the dialysis ward, measuring body temperature, hand disinfection, masking for all patients and staff, and personal protective equipment for staff members. These measures were also recommended in most of the 14 guidelines that were identified in the inventory of national guidelines and were also scored as being among the most important measures by the authors of this paper. Heterogeneity existed between centres and national guidelines regarding the minimal distance between dialysis chairs and recommendations regarding isolation and cohorting. Conclusions Although variation existed, measures to prevent transmission of SARS-CoV-2 were relatively similar across centres and national guidelines. Further research is needed to assess causal relationships between measures taken and spread of SARS-CoV-2.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Onţanu, Elena Alina; Velicogna, Marco;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Tomris, Ilhan; Unione, Luca; Nguyen, Linh; Zaree, Pouya; Bouwman, Kim M; Liu, Lin; Li, Zeshi; Fok, Jelle A; Ríos Carrasco, María; van der Woude, Roosmarijn; +15 more
    Publisher: bioRxiv
    Country: Netherlands

    SARS-CoV-2 viruses engage ACE2 as a functional receptor with their spike protein. The S1 domain of the spike protein contains a C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) and an N-terminal domain (NTD). The NTD of other coronaviruses includes a glycan-binding cleft. However, for the SARS-CoV-2 NTD protein-glycan binding was only observed weakly for sialic acids with highly sensitive methods. Amino acid changes in the NTD of Variants of Concern (VoC) shows antigenic pressure, which can be an indication of NTD-mediated receptor binding. Trimeric NTD proteins of SARS-CoV-2, Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron did not reveal a receptor binding capability. Unexpectedly, the SARS-CoV-2 Beta subvariant strain (501Y.V2-1) NTD binding to Vero E6 cells was sensitive to sialidase pretreatment. Glycan microarray analyses identified a putative 9- O -acetylated sialic acid as a ligand, which was confirmed by catch-and-release ESI-MS, STD-NMR analyses, and a graphene-based electrochemical sensor. The Beta (501Y.V2-1) variant attained an enhanced glycan binding modality in the NTD with specificity towards 9- O -acetylated structures, suggesting a dual-receptor functionality of the SARS-CoV-2 S1 domain, which was quickly selected against. These results indicate that SARS-CoV-2 can probe additional evolutionary space, allowing binding to glycan receptors on the surface of target cells. Graphical abstract: Synopsis: Coronaviruses utilize their N-terminal domain (NTD) for initial reversible low-affinity interaction to (sialylated) glycans. This initial low-affinity/high-avidity engagement enables viral surfing on the target membrane, potentially followed by a stronger secondary receptor interaction. Several coronaviruses, such as HKU1 and OC43, possess a hemagglutinin-esterase for viral release after sialic acid interaction, thus allowing viral dissemination. Other coronaviruses, such as MERS-CoV, do not possess a hemagglutinin-esterase, but interact reversibly to sialic acids allowing for viral surfing and dissemination. The early 501Y.V2-1 subvariant of the Beta SARS-CoV-2 Variant of Concern has attained a receptor-binding functionality towards 9- O -acetylated sialic acid using its NTD. This binding functionality was selected against rapidly, most likely due to poor dissemination. Ablation of sialic acid binding in more recent SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern suggests a fine balance of sialic acid interaction of SARS-CoV-2 is required for infection and/or transmission.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sharma, Parvarish; Dhanjal, Daljeet Singh; Chopra, Chirag; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; van der Spek, Peter J.; Sharma, Hari S.; Satija, Saurabh;
    Country: Netherlands

    Asthma, COPD, COVID-19, EGPA, Lung cancer, and Pneumonia are major chronic respiratory diseases (or CRDs) affecting millions worldwide and account for substantial morbidity and mortality. These CRDs are irreversible diseases that affect different parts of the respiratory system, imposing a considerable burden on different socio-economic classes. All these CRDs have been linked to increased eosinophils in the lungs. Eosinophils are essential immune mediators that contribute to tissue homeostasis and the pathophysiology of various diseases. Interestingly, elevated eosinophil level is associated with cellular processes that regulate airway hyperresponsiveness, airway remodeling, mucus hypersecretion, and inflammation in the lung. Therefore, eosinophil is considered the therapeutic target in eosinophil-mediated lung diseases. Although, conventional medicines like antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and bronchodilators are available to prevent CRDs. But the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents after long-term usage remains a challenge. However, progressive development in nanotechnology has unveiled the targeted nanocarrier approach that can significantly improve the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic drug. The potential of the nanocarrier system can be specifically targeted on eosinophils and their associated components to obtain promising results in the pharmacotherapy of CRDs. This review intends to provide knowledge about eosinophils and their role in CRDs. Moreover, it also discusses nanocarrier drug delivery systems for the targeted treatment of CRDs.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Kelder, J.M.;
    Country: Netherlands

    From an Ancient Egyptian plague to the Black Death and Spanish flu, epidemics have often spurred societal transformations. Understanding why can help us create a better world after covid-19

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    GORDON, A.L.; SPILSBURY, K.; Achterberg, W.P.; ADAMS, R.; JONES, L.; GOODMAN, C.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Long-term care homes play an essential role within health and social care. Successful measures to support older people at home for longer have led to increased prevalence of disability, frailty and cognitive impairment in those who live in care homes over the last two decades. The need for care home places is projected to increase for the next two decades. Modern care homes provide care for people who are predominantly over 80, have multiple long-term conditions, take multiple medicines, are physically dependent and live with cognitive impairment. Residents do better when services recognise the contributions of staff and care home providers rather than treating residents as individual patients living in a communal setting. There is a strong case given residents' frailty, multimorbidity and disability, that care should be structured around Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). Care should be designed to allow opportunities for multiprofessional teams to come together for CGA, particularly if healthcare professionals are based outside care homes. Good data about care homes and residents are central to efforts to deliver high quality care-in some countries, these data are collected but not collated. Collating such data is a priority. Care home staff are under-recognised and underpaid-parity of pay and opportunity with NHS staff is the bare minimum to ensure that the best are recruited and retained in the sector. During the COVID-19 pandemic, residents and relatives have frequently been left out of decisions about policies that affect them, and better consultation is needed to deliver high quality care.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Brasil Varandas Pinto, A.L.; Eum, S.; Klippe, W. van de; Rafols Garcia, I.;
    Country: Netherlands
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Orchard, Christa; Smith, Peter M; Kromhout, Hans; IRAS OH Epidemiology Chemical Agents; dIRAS RA-2;
    Country: Netherlands

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted productivity of female academics in the field of occupational and environmental health, by examining trends in male and female authorship of submissions during and prior to the COVID-19 pandemic in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. METHODS: Administrative data on submissions between January 2017 and November 2021 were obtained through databases held at BMJ journals. Author gender was identified using an existing algorithm based on matching names to social media accounts. The number and proportion of female and male primary (first) and senior (last) authors were examined for each quarter, and the average change in share of monthly submissions from male authors in the months since the pandemic compared with corresponding months prior to the pandemic were identified using regression models estimating least squares means. RESULTS: Among 2286 (64.7%) and 2335 (66.1%) manuscripts for which first and last author gender were identified, respectively, 49.3% of prepandemic submissions were from male first authors, increasing to 55.4% in the first year of the pandemic (difference of 6.1%, 95% CI 1.3% to 10.7%), before dropping to 46.6% from April 2021 onwards. Quarterly counts identified a large increase in submissions from male authors during the first year after the onset of the pandemic, and a smaller increase from female authors. The proportion of male last authors did not change significantly during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that there has been an increase in male productivity during the COVID-19 pandemic within the field of occupational and environmental health research that is present to a lesser extent among women.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Becker, C.; Achterberg, W.;
    Country: Netherlands

    The sustainability of healthcare of older people in Europe is at stake. Many experts currently focus on the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. But there are other elements coming up that might even have a greater impact. Healthcare systems, geriatric care and geriatric rehabilitation in particular, will face disruptive changes due to both demographic demand and a shortage of human and financial resources. This decade will be transformed by a high proportion of the older health workforce transitioning to retirement. This expertise must be retained. The brain drain of health care workers migrating from Eastern parts to Western Europe is diminishing. Discussing and deciding upon the priorities of value-based health care for older people such as equity and access is required. The acute healthcare sector in most countries focuses on fee-for-service models instead of building systemic approaches to maximise independence and autonomy of older citizens. In this commentary, we build on recent book chapters and articles on geriatric rehabililtation. Our main questions for the anniversary edition of Age and Ageing is what it is that geriatric rehabilitation could, should and must contribute in the roaring 2020s?

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Country: Netherlands

    After two years of COVID-19 we all know that communicating through a flat screen is exhausting. Since long before that, professor Pablo Cesar has been focussing his research on highly realistic volumetric video conferencing which will allow smooth, natural, communication and collaboration – making remoteness a thing of the past.