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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
26 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • COVID-19
  • Lecture
  • English

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vander Elst, Tinne; Vandenbroeck, Sofie; Boets, Isabelle; Godderis, Lode;
    Publisher: ELSEVIER
    Country: Belgium

    ispartof: pages:S305-S306 ispartof: SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK vol:13 pages:S305-S306 status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ceulemans, Michael; Foulon, Veerle; Panchaud, Alice; Winterfeld, Ursula; Pomar, Leo; Lambelet, Valentine; Cleary, Brian; O'Shaughnessy, Fergal; Passier, Anneke; Richardson, Jonathan Luke; +1 more
    Countries: Belgium, Switzerland

    Insight into the epidemiology of perinatal medication use during the COVID-19 pandemic is scarce. Therefore, a cross-sectional study using an anonymous web survey was performed in Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, The Netherlands, and United Kingdom (UK) to investigate the prevalence and type of medications used by pregnant and breast-feeding women during the first pandemic wave. Factors associated with medication use were estimated by logistic regression. In total, 8378 women participated (i.e., 3666 pregnant and 4712 breastfeeding women). Most responses were collected in Norway (34%) and The Netherlands (28%), followed by Switzerland (19%), Ireland (17%) and UK (2%). Participants were more often professionally active and more often had a higher educational level compared to the general birthing population in each country. Overall, approximately 60% of women reported having used at least 1 medication in the preceding 3 months. Daily and occasional use was reported by 34% and 42% of pregnant and 29% and 44% of breastfeeding women. The most prevalent ATC (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical) categories were the nervous system, the respiratory system, the alimentary tract/metabolism, and the musculo-skeletal system. Paracetamol, ibuprofen, antacids, and cetirizine were the most frequently used medications. The rate of antibacterial use was lower than previously reported. Having a chronic illness, country, maternal age, SARS-CoV-2 testing, professional status and time since delivery were associated with medication use. In conclusion, perinatal medication use was highly prevalent during the first pandemic wave, underlining the importance of maintaining counseling efforts on medication use, even in times of disrupted healthcare services and/or limited resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Coenen, Laurien;
    Country: Belgium

    Abstract accepted for presentation at the annual BELMAS conference. Whilst the abstract will be accessible in the Conference's programme book, it will not be presented due to COVID-19 measures and the corresponding cancelation of the 2020 conference. ispartof: BELMAS 2020 location:De Vere Horwood Estate, Milton Keynes, UK date:3 Jul - 5 Jul 2020 status: published

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Thygesen, Niels; Sapir, André; Santer, Jacques; Miedma, Douwe;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary approach that draws on historical and archive research and takes into consideration the theoretical debates in the literature and the various methodological challenges.What are the multifaceted future provocation facing Economic and Monetary Union? What steps still need to be taken to complete the project? How can we strengthen the international role of the euro and bolster Europe’s economic and financial autonomy? How can we best tackle technological developments in the field of money and finance? And how is the COVID-19 crisis testing the boundaries of the European integration?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lica, Diana Maria;
    Country: Belgium

    Throughout the evolution of the global COVID-19 pandemic, much of the public attention has been turned towards timely delivery of vaccine doses, to the attached verbal and contractual arm-wrestling between governments and pharmaceutical companies, or yet to the debate on the feasibility of a waiver on related IP rights. However, another exchange of uttermost importance has been left somewhere out of the limelight: pathogen sharing. As a matter of fact, sharing among laboratories of SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 has been the first link within the chain of development of diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics. Despite its relevance in upstream research, pathogen sharing has been taken for granted in the backstage of “science happening”, this perhaps stemming from the understanding that pathogens fall within the category of “commons”. However, a strict reading of the (CBD) (1992) and the Nagoya Protocol to such Convention (NP) (2014) ̶ legal instruments seeking to counter the misappropriation of genetic resources of countries and associated traditional knowledge ̶ leads to pathogens generally falling under the umbrella of “genetic resources”. As such, they pertain to the country of origin, which must “consent” to these being accessed on “mutually agreed terms” covering “access and benefit sharing” (ABS) arrangements to benefits issued from such utilization. In past epidemics ̶ H5N1 (2006), MERS-COV (2012)̶ Indonesia and Saudi Arabia instrumentalized and reframed CBD language to “legally” restrict access to such pathogens, in a narrative move qualified as viral sovereignty. If the outbreak in China was not accompanied by any such sovereign claims, a recent WHO Report on “The public health implications of the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol” (6/Jan/2021) underlined NP effects during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this session is to discuss such implications, namely the NP acting like a double-edged sword: creating suitable frameworks for SARS-CoV-2 sharing but also considerable brakes; followed by a discussion on the operationalization of Article 8b NP (expeditious access to genetic resources in health emergencies). ispartof: Global Congress of Intellectual Property and the Public Interest location:Cartagena, Colombia (online) date:25 Oct - 29 Oct 2021 status: Published online

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fay, Jennifer;
    Publisher: ICI Berlin
    Country: Germany

    This talk connects the writings of Hannah Arendt and Stanley Cavell to questions of thinking: what it is and how it appears in the world and on film. For both philosophers, thinking may be understood as a form of leave-taking, roaming, even of straying; the mind wanders while the body stays put. That is, thinking is a form of errancy. Arendt argues that thinking, which deals with ‘invisibilities and is itself invisible’, poses a challenge to representation (there is, she writes, a ‘scarcity of documentary evidence’). In contrast, Cavell turns to the camera’s ‘knowledge of the metaphysical restlessness’ in the fidgety body whose mind is at work. When it catches the body in thought, cinema may even ‘prove thinking’, albeit through the body’s least intelligent activity. Whereas Arendt is concerned that thinking defies representation, Cavell worries that with the arrival of cinema, the mind, betrayed by the body, is in a state of perpetual visibility and subject to misunderstanding (a concern related to his career-long interest in ‘the problem of other minds’). In his reading of Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cavell explains how cinema phenomenalizes the errancy of thought and dramatizes errors of interpretation. This talk takes up the idea of errancy as a property of thinking in cinematic environments. The talk will be followed by discussion with Gertrud Koch and Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky. Jennifer Fay is Professor of Film and English at Vanderbilt University where she also directs the Program in Cinema & Media Arts. She is the author or co-author of three books, most recently Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (2018). Her current book project is tentatively titled ‘Sincerity and the Media of Appearance’. She was supposed to start a research fellowship at Cinepoetics — Center for Advanced Film Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2020, which had to be postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Jennifer Fay, Thinking on Film with Arendt and Cavell, lecture, ICI Berlin, 25 May 2020, video recording, mp4, 47:31

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sölter, Jan; Proverbio, Daniele; Baniasadi, Mehri; Bossa, Matias Nicolas; Vlasov, Vanja; Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz; Husch, Andreas;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Our working hypothesis is that key factors in COVID-19 imaging are the available imaging data and their label noise and confounders, rather than network architectures per se. Thus, we applied existing state-of-the-art convolution neural network frameworks based on the U-Net architecture, namely nnU-Net [3], and focused on leveraging the available training data. We did not apply any pre-training nor modi ed the network architecture. First, we enriched training information by generating two additional labels for lung and body area. Lung labels were created with a public available lung segmentation network and weak body labels were generated by thresholding. Subsequently, we trained three di erent multi-class networks: 2-label (original background and lesion labels), 3-label (additional lung label) and 4-label (additional lung and body label). The 3-label obtained the best single network performance in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.756) and on the leaderboard (Dice- Score 0.755, Haussdor 95-Score 57.5). To improve robustness, we created a weighted ensemble of all three models, with calibrated weights to optimise the ranking in Dice-Score. This ensemble achieved a slight performance gain in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.760). On the validation set leaderboard, it improved our Dice-Score to 0.768 and Haussdor 95- Score to 54.8. It ranked 3rd in phase I according to mean Dice-Score. Adding unlabelled data from the public TCIA dataset in a student-teacher manner signi cantly improved our internal validation score (Dice-Score of 0.770). However, we noticed partial overlap between our additional training data (although not human-labelled) and nal test data and therefore submitted the ensemble without additional data, to yield realistic assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vandenbroeck, Sofie; Elst, Tinne Vander; Godderis, Lode;
    Publisher: ELSEVIER
    Country: Belgium

    ispartof: pages:S185-S185 ispartof: SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK vol:13 pages:S185-S185 status: published

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Boumans, M.J.; Dep USE; UU LEG Research UUSE Multidisciplinary Economics;
    Country: Netherlands
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
26 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vander Elst, Tinne; Vandenbroeck, Sofie; Boets, Isabelle; Godderis, Lode;
    Publisher: ELSEVIER
    Country: Belgium

    ispartof: pages:S305-S306 ispartof: SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK vol:13 pages:S305-S306 status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ceulemans, Michael; Foulon, Veerle; Panchaud, Alice; Winterfeld, Ursula; Pomar, Leo; Lambelet, Valentine; Cleary, Brian; O'Shaughnessy, Fergal; Passier, Anneke; Richardson, Jonathan Luke; +1 more
    Countries: Belgium, Switzerland

    Insight into the epidemiology of perinatal medication use during the COVID-19 pandemic is scarce. Therefore, a cross-sectional study using an anonymous web survey was performed in Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, The Netherlands, and United Kingdom (UK) to investigate the prevalence and type of medications used by pregnant and breast-feeding women during the first pandemic wave. Factors associated with medication use were estimated by logistic regression. In total, 8378 women participated (i.e., 3666 pregnant and 4712 breastfeeding women). Most responses were collected in Norway (34%) and The Netherlands (28%), followed by Switzerland (19%), Ireland (17%) and UK (2%). Participants were more often professionally active and more often had a higher educational level compared to the general birthing population in each country. Overall, approximately 60% of women reported having used at least 1 medication in the preceding 3 months. Daily and occasional use was reported by 34% and 42% of pregnant and 29% and 44% of breastfeeding women. The most prevalent ATC (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical) categories were the nervous system, the respiratory system, the alimentary tract/metabolism, and the musculo-skeletal system. Paracetamol, ibuprofen, antacids, and cetirizine were the most frequently used medications. The rate of antibacterial use was lower than previously reported. Having a chronic illness, country, maternal age, SARS-CoV-2 testing, professional status and time since delivery were associated with medication use. In conclusion, perinatal medication use was highly prevalent during the first pandemic wave, underlining the importance of maintaining counseling efforts on medication use, even in times of disrupted healthcare services and/or limited resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Coenen, Laurien;
    Country: Belgium

    Abstract accepted for presentation at the annual BELMAS conference. Whilst the abstract will be accessible in the Conference's programme book, it will not be presented due to COVID-19 measures and the corresponding cancelation of the 2020 conference. ispartof: BELMAS 2020 location:De Vere Horwood Estate, Milton Keynes, UK date:3 Jul - 5 Jul 2020 status: published

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Thygesen, Niels; Sapir, André; Santer, Jacques; Miedma, Douwe;
    Country: Luxembourg

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Werner Report, it is well worth analysing the role of Economic and Monetary Union at a time of uncertainty as to the wider European project, via an interdisciplinary approach that draws on historical and archive research and takes into consideration the theoretical debates in the literature and the various methodological challenges.What are the multifaceted future provocation facing Economic and Monetary Union? What steps still need to be taken to complete the project? How can we strengthen the international role of the euro and bolster Europe’s economic and financial autonomy? How can we best tackle technological developments in the field of money and finance? And how is the COVID-19 crisis testing the boundaries of the European integration?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lica, Diana Maria;
    Country: Belgium

    Throughout the evolution of the global COVID-19 pandemic, much of the public attention has been turned towards timely delivery of vaccine doses, to the attached verbal and contractual arm-wrestling between governments and pharmaceutical companies, or yet to the debate on the feasibility of a waiver on related IP rights. However, another exchange of uttermost importance has been left somewhere out of the limelight: pathogen sharing. As a matter of fact, sharing among laboratories of SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 has been the first link within the chain of development of diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics. Despite its relevance in upstream research, pathogen sharing has been taken for granted in the backstage of “science happening”, this perhaps stemming from the understanding that pathogens fall within the category of “commons”. However, a strict reading of the (CBD) (1992) and the Nagoya Protocol to such Convention (NP) (2014) ̶ legal instruments seeking to counter the misappropriation of genetic resources of countries and associated traditional knowledge ̶ leads to pathogens generally falling under the umbrella of “genetic resources”. As such, they pertain to the country of origin, which must “consent” to these being accessed on “mutually agreed terms” covering “access and benefit sharing” (ABS) arrangements to benefits issued from such utilization. In past epidemics ̶ H5N1 (2006), MERS-COV (2012)̶ Indonesia and Saudi Arabia instrumentalized and reframed CBD language to “legally” restrict access to such pathogens, in a narrative move qualified as viral sovereignty. If the outbreak in China was not accompanied by any such sovereign claims, a recent WHO Report on “The public health implications of the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol” (6/Jan/2021) underlined NP effects during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this session is to discuss such implications, namely the NP acting like a double-edged sword: creating suitable frameworks for SARS-CoV-2 sharing but also considerable brakes; followed by a discussion on the operationalization of Article 8b NP (expeditious access to genetic resources in health emergencies). ispartof: Global Congress of Intellectual Property and the Public Interest location:Cartagena, Colombia (online) date:25 Oct - 29 Oct 2021 status: Published online

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fay, Jennifer;
    Publisher: ICI Berlin
    Country: Germany

    This talk connects the writings of Hannah Arendt and Stanley Cavell to questions of thinking: what it is and how it appears in the world and on film. For both philosophers, thinking may be understood as a form of leave-taking, roaming, even of straying; the mind wanders while the body stays put. That is, thinking is a form of errancy. Arendt argues that thinking, which deals with ‘invisibilities and is itself invisible’, poses a challenge to representation (there is, she writes, a ‘scarcity of documentary evidence’). In contrast, Cavell turns to the camera’s ‘knowledge of the metaphysical restlessness’ in the fidgety body whose mind is at work. When it catches the body in thought, cinema may even ‘prove thinking’, albeit through the body’s least intelligent activity. Whereas Arendt is concerned that thinking defies representation, Cavell worries that with the arrival of cinema, the mind, betrayed by the body, is in a state of perpetual visibility and subject to misunderstanding (a concern related to his career-long interest in ‘the problem of other minds’). In his reading of Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cavell explains how cinema phenomenalizes the errancy of thought and dramatizes errors of interpretation. This talk takes up the idea of errancy as a property of thinking in cinematic environments. The talk will be followed by discussion with Gertrud Koch and Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky. Jennifer Fay is Professor of Film and English at Vanderbilt University where she also directs the Program in Cinema & Media Arts. She is the author or co-author of three books, most recently Inhospitable World: Cinema in the Time of the Anthropocene (2018). Her current book project is tentatively titled ‘Sincerity and the Media of Appearance’. She was supposed to start a research fellowship at Cinepoetics — Center for Advanced Film Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2020, which had to be postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Jennifer Fay, Thinking on Film with Arendt and Cavell, lecture, ICI Berlin, 25 May 2020, video recording, mp4, 47:31

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sölter, Jan; Proverbio, Daniele; Baniasadi, Mehri; Bossa, Matias Nicolas; Vlasov, Vanja; Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz; Husch, Andreas;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Our working hypothesis is that key factors in COVID-19 imaging are the available imaging data and their label noise and confounders, rather than network architectures per se. Thus, we applied existing state-of-the-art convolution neural network frameworks based on the U-Net architecture, namely nnU-Net [3], and focused on leveraging the available training data. We did not apply any pre-training nor modi ed the network architecture. First, we enriched training information by generating two additional labels for lung and body area. Lung labels were created with a public available lung segmentation network and weak body labels were generated by thresholding. Subsequently, we trained three di erent multi-class networks: 2-label (original background and lesion labels), 3-label (additional lung label) and 4-label (additional lung and body label). The 3-label obtained the best single network performance in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.756) and on the leaderboard (Dice- Score 0.755, Haussdor 95-Score 57.5). To improve robustness, we created a weighted ensemble of all three models, with calibrated weights to optimise the ranking in Dice-Score. This ensemble achieved a slight performance gain in internal cross-validation (Dice-Score 0.760). On the validation set leaderboard, it improved our Dice-Score to 0.768 and Haussdor 95- Score to 54.8. It ranked 3rd in phase I according to mean Dice-Score. Adding unlabelled data from the public TCIA dataset in a student-teacher manner signi cantly improved our internal validation score (Dice-Score of 0.770). However, we noticed partial overlap between our additional training data (although not human-labelled) and nal test data and therefore submitted the ensemble without additional data, to yield realistic assessments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vandenbroeck, Sofie; Elst, Tinne Vander; Godderis, Lode;
    Publisher: ELSEVIER
    Country: Belgium

    ispartof: pages:S185-S185 ispartof: SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK vol:13 pages:S185-S185 status: published

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Boumans, M.J.; Dep USE; UU LEG Research UUSE Multidisciplinary Economics;
    Country: Netherlands