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The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
72 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • COVID-19
  • CA
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  • VIUSpace
  • Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU Amsterdam) - Institutional Repository
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Julia Nordlund; Richard S. Henry; Linda Kwakkenbos; Marie-Eve Carrier; Brooke Levis; Warren R. Nielson; Susan J. Bartlett; Laura Dyas; Lydia Tao; Claire Fedoruk; +109 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: CIHR

    Abstract Background Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease. We completed an initial feasibility trial of an online self-administered version of the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Self-Management (SPIN-SELF) Program using the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Due to low intervention offer uptake, we will conduct a new feasibility trial with progression to full-scale trial, using a two-arm parallel, partially nested RCT design. The SPIN-SELF Program has also been revised to include facilitator-led videoconference group sessions in addition to online material. We will test the group-based intervention delivery format, then evaluate the effect of the SPIN-SELF Program on disease management self-efficacy (primary) and patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes (secondary). Methods This study is a feasibility trial with progression to full-scale RCT, pending meeting pre-defined criteria, of the SPIN-SELF Program. Participants will be recruited from the ongoing SPIN Cohort (http://www.spinsclero.com/en/cohort) and via social media and partner patient organizations. Eligible participants must have SSc and low to moderate disease management self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (SEMCD) Scale score ≤ 7.0). Participants will be randomized (1:1 allocation) to the group-based SPIN-SELF Program or usual care for 3 months. The primary outcome in the full-scale trial will be disease management self-efficacy based on SEMCD Scale scores at 3 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes include SEMCD scores 6 months post-randomization plus patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes at 3 and 6 months post-randomization. We will include 40 participants to assess feasibility. At the end of the feasibility portion, stoppage criteria will be used to determine if the trial procedures or SPIN-SELF Program need important modifications, thereby requiring a re-set for the full-scale trial. Otherwise, the full-scale RCT will proceed, and outcome data from the feasibility portion will be utilized in the full-scale trial. In the full-scale RCT, 524 participants will be recruited. Discussion The SPIN-SELF Program may improve disease management self-efficacy, patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes in people with SSc. SPIN works with partner patient organizations around the world to disseminate its programs free-of-charge. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.govNCT04246528. Registered on 27 January 2020

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Piva, Alyssa;
    Country: Canada

    This research explores the perspectives of faculty members teaching in undergraduate tourism programs across British Columbia (BC), Canada regarding curricula revitalization in consideration of macro changes that have occurred in the tourism industry worldwide including the COVID-19 pandemic, the ongoing climate change crisis, and the urgent need for indigenization. With a focus on programs that offer bachelor’s degrees in tourism management, this qualitative study investigates the perspectives of nine faculty members representing Capilano University, Royal Roads University, Thompson Rivers University, and Vancouver Island University. Data was collected by conducting semi-structured interviews. A reflexive thematic analysis indicated one overarching theme: collaboration; two themes: tourism management higher education must 1) craft leaders who embody 21st century skills and 2) be as dynamic as the tourism industry; and three subthemes: 1) multi-disciplinary, 2) work-integrated learning, and 3) macro changes. Due to the rapid pace of change in the tourism industry, the current curriculum offered in tourism management degree programs across BC must be reimagined. Recommendations include course content revitalization, mandatory work-integrated learning, and the renewal and maintenance of collaboration across institutions. The study’s findings are relevant to tourism management students, faculty members and higher education institutions in British Columbia.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Orleni, Erica;
    Country: Canada

    This paper aims to explore the demand for wellness tourism and how it has grown in the last decade. This growth is in part due to increased stress levels from various factors. Some of these factors are heightened stress in society such as COVID-19 and high inflation, people working longer hours, unhealthy lifestyles, and higher obesity rates. The study focused on the demographic cohort known as millennials, ranging from 25 to 40 years of age. Millennials are projected to account for 75 percent of consumers and travelers by 2025 globally. The study aimed to determine how Destination Marketing Organizations (DMO) can rethink their approaches for targeting millennial consumers and travelers and the preferences of Canadian millennials specifically related to their perceptions and their needs from wellness tourism within Canada. The material presented in the literature review represents the relevance of wellness, wellness in tourism, the importance of wellness in Canada, the impact of COVID-19, and millennials' characteristics and influence on tourism. The study uses a qualitative approach for interviews with DMOs on how to approach their marketing strategies and a mix-method approach on surveys for millennials on how they perceive wellness tourism. The qualitative research assisted in identifying the elements of millennial travel and DMO's influence in marketing to the demographic. Appreciative Inquiry (AI) was the critical component in developing the questions for the interview and survey. The questions focused on AI's four D's: Dream, Destiny, Discovery, and Design. The purpose of AI is to help anticipate if the best-case scenario occurred more frequently within the wellness tourism industry in Canada instead of analyzing problems. The data gathered produced a list of the critical factors pertaining to millennial consumer and travel behavior, the importance of wellness tourism for the millennial demographic, and DMO's marketing techniques to target millennial travelers within Canada. Additionally, the data also produced recommendations for the future of wellness and tourism.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Janzen, Nicholas J.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a myriad of impacts and consequences for secondary school education resulting in, among other things, decreased student engagement and increased issues related to student mental health. The issues of student engagement and mental health are not borne solely from the pandemic however, and teachers have long been seeking ways to address these issues as our traditional educational paradigms lag behind in their ability to combat these problems. This Process Paper and accompanying Major Project seek to address these issues through the Critical Challenge Question, “How can gamified design increase student engagement to support improvements in mental health in secondary fine arts courses?” Photoshop Gamified is a sample gamified secondary elective course designed to introduce teachers to the principles and practice of gamification in secondary education through a research and evidence-based approach to course design and delivery. This sample gamified course utilizes the Google Suite for Education Learning Management System through the use of Google Sites, Docs, and Classroom and is intended for use in both face-to-face and blended learning environments. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25218/Janzen.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holland, Mark;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In this paper, urban planner, development consultant and educator, Mark Holland, outlines a rethinking of urban structure that will be supercharged as we learn from the impacts of COVID 19 on our cities. The modern city region has been focused on building high density downtowns and peripheral town centres, based on assumptions that are now out of date as a basis for regional planning. COVID 19 closed our downtowns and we now need to reinvent our urban and regional patterns in light of what we have (re)discovered from our pandemic response. Restructuring our economy, social patterns, food systems and regional growth patterns into a network of high-street-based corridors will not only make us more resilient to shocks like COVID 19, but overall create a much healthier, sustainable, and economically viable region. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23638/HollandFP2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Susan L. Prescott; Ganesa Wegienka; Remco Kort; David H. Nelson; Sabine Gabrysch; Trevor Hancock; Anita L. Kozyrskyj; Christopher A. Lowry; Nicole Redvers; Blake Poland; +21 more
    Countries: Australia, Netherlands, United Kingdom

    The “Earthrise” photograph, taken on the 1968 Apollo 8 mission, became one of the most significant images of the 20th Century. It triggered a profound shift in environmental awareness and the potential for human unity—inspiring the first Earth Day in 1970. Taking inspiration from these events 50 years later, we initiated Project Earthrise at our 2020 annual conference of inVIVO Planetary Health. This builds on the emergent concept of planetary health, which provides a shared narrative to integrate rich and diverse approaches from all aspects of society towards shared solutions to global challenges. The acute catastrophe of the COVID-19 pandemic has drawn greater attention to many other interconnected global health, environmental, social, spiritual, and economic problems that have been underappreciated or neglected for decades. This is accelerating opportunities for greater collaborative action, as many groups now focus on the necessity of a “Great Transition”. While ambitious integrative efforts have never been more important, it is imperative to apply these with mutualistic value systems as a compass, as we seek to make wiser choices. Project Earthrise is our contribution to this important process. This underscores the imperative for creative ecological solutions to challenges in all systems, on all scales with advancing global urbanization in the digital age—for personal, environmental, economic and societal health alike. At the same time, our agenda seeks to equally consider our social and spiritual ecology as it does natural ecology. Revisiting the inspiration of “Earthrise”, we welcome diverse perspectives from across all dimensions of the arts and the sciences, to explore novel solutions and new normative values. Building on academic rigor, we seek to place greater value on imagination, kindness and mutualism as we address our greatest challenges, for the health of people, places and planet.

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Canadian Institute of Planners
    Country: Canada

    Canada in 2050: What does the future look like?|Le Canada en 2050 : À quoi ressemble l’avenir? / Glenn Miller & Ray Tomalty -- On a different path towards 2050: Future-proofing cities against climate change / David Miller -- Planning plausible futures / Sarah Krapez, Blair Underhill, & Robert Barrs -- Plan UX: Designing plans and processes for a rapidly changing world / Robert Barrs & Kasia Tota -- Social infrastructure: Increasing quality of life amid an uncertain futures / Dylan Thiessen -- Transforming Vancouver into a water sensitive city by 2020 / Julie McManus & Wendy de Hoog -- Planning education: The next generation / Markus Moos -- Immigrants in suburbs are restructuring the Toronto Region / Mohammad A. Qadeer -- CIP and COVID-19|L'ICU et la COVID-19 / Beth McMahon -- John Merton Wright: 1929-1999 / Nicholas Tunnacliffe Canada in 2050|Le Canada en 2050 Canada in 2050: What does the future look like?|Le Canada en 2050 : À quoi ressemble l’avenir? / Glenn Miller & Ray Tomalty -- On a different path towards 2050: Future-proofing cities against climate change / David Miller -- Planning plausible futures / Sarah Krapez, Blair Underhill, & Robert Barrs -- Plan UX: Designing plans and processes for a rapidly changing world / Robert Barrs & Kasia Tota -- Social infrastructure: Increasing quality of life amid an uncertain futures / Dylan Thiessen -- Transforming Vancouver into a water sensitive city by 2020 / Julie McManus & Wendy de Hoog -- Planning education: The next generation / Markus Moos -- Immigrants in suburbs are restructuring the Toronto Region / Mohammad A. Qadeer -- CIP and COVID-19|L'ICU et la COVID-19 / Beth McMahon -- John Merton Wright: 1929-1999 / Nicholas Tunnacliffe https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25291/PlanCanada_Summer2020.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McCunn, Lindsay J.;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has produced an opportunity for urban planners, government decision-makers, health practitioners, and environmental psychologists to further understand human psychosocial wellbeing in cities. Given a growing base of evidence illustrating that interaction with nature positively affects mood and mental health, preserving access to green spaces in cities during this time of mandated social isolation should be considered imperative for as long as possible. This think-piece highlights that parks, community gardens, and other natural areas are essential to urban dwellers, especially if directives to physically distance from one another become longstanding or recurrent. Public decision-makers should aim to develop simple, relatively inexpensive strategies to augment the usability of nature in innovative ways that make it possible to enjoy them while respecting distance guidelines. Also discussed is the notion that a predominant goal for social scientists and urban practitioners during this crisis will be to learn how people view the ways in which public parks and wilder urban areas mitigate their response to worry, isolation, and an altered form of civic engagement. Research on the extent to which ���sense of place��� changes for city dwellers during this global circumstance will be important for planners and social scientists alike. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Cities & Health on July 30, 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23748834.2020.1795385.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    By, Natassja Courtney;
    Country: Canada

    This action research inquiry, undertaken in partnership with the Independent Schools Association of British Columbia (ISABC), was guided by the question: How might the ISABC’s Team Leadership Program support the leadership development and thriving of emerging and middle leaders throughout and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic? Data were collected with a survey and two focus groups involving 52 participants from 16 independent schools. Arts-based approaches included photo elicitation and found poetry. Key findings indicated the pandemic has magnified the human side of educational leadership and thriving as being a middle leader requires communication, relationship building, and the prioritization of followers’ needs. Recommendations addressed strategies to (a) develop self-awareness, coaching, and interpersonal skills amongst emerging leaders; (b) capitalize on existing leadership networks to foster a stronger sense of belonging within the ISABC; and (c) offer leadership-focused professional development and resources accessible to the broader ISABC community. Keywords: arts-based research, found poetry, K–12, independent schools, leadership development, middle leaders, photo elicitation, thriving at work

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to COVID-19. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
72 Research products, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Julia Nordlund; Richard S. Henry; Linda Kwakkenbos; Marie-Eve Carrier; Brooke Levis; Warren R. Nielson; Susan J. Bartlett; Laura Dyas; Lydia Tao; Claire Fedoruk; +109 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: CIHR

    Abstract Background Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease. We completed an initial feasibility trial of an online self-administered version of the Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network Self-Management (SPIN-SELF) Program using the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. Due to low intervention offer uptake, we will conduct a new feasibility trial with progression to full-scale trial, using a two-arm parallel, partially nested RCT design. The SPIN-SELF Program has also been revised to include facilitator-led videoconference group sessions in addition to online material. We will test the group-based intervention delivery format, then evaluate the effect of the SPIN-SELF Program on disease management self-efficacy (primary) and patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes (secondary). Methods This study is a feasibility trial with progression to full-scale RCT, pending meeting pre-defined criteria, of the SPIN-SELF Program. Participants will be recruited from the ongoing SPIN Cohort (http://www.spinsclero.com/en/cohort) and via social media and partner patient organizations. Eligible participants must have SSc and low to moderate disease management self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease (SEMCD) Scale score ≤ 7.0). Participants will be randomized (1:1 allocation) to the group-based SPIN-SELF Program or usual care for 3 months. The primary outcome in the full-scale trial will be disease management self-efficacy based on SEMCD Scale scores at 3 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes include SEMCD scores 6 months post-randomization plus patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes at 3 and 6 months post-randomization. We will include 40 participants to assess feasibility. At the end of the feasibility portion, stoppage criteria will be used to determine if the trial procedures or SPIN-SELF Program need important modifications, thereby requiring a re-set for the full-scale trial. Otherwise, the full-scale RCT will proceed, and outcome data from the feasibility portion will be utilized in the full-scale trial. In the full-scale RCT, 524 participants will be recruited. Discussion The SPIN-SELF Program may improve disease management self-efficacy, patient activation, social appearance anxiety, and functional health outcomes in people with SSc. SPIN works with partner patient organizations around the world to disseminate its programs free-of-charge. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.govNCT04246528. Registered on 27 January 2020

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jóhannesson, Gunnar Thór; Welling, Johannes; Müller, Dieter K.; Lundmark, Linda; Nilsson, Robert O.; de la Barre, Suzanne; Granås, Brynhild; Kvidal-Røvik, Trine; Rantala, Outi; Tervo-Kankare, Kaarina; +1 more
    Publisher: Nordic Council of Ministers
    Country: Canada

    This report was originally published as: Jóhannesson, G.T., Welling, J., Müller, D.K., Lundmark, L., Nilsson, R.O., de la Barre, S., Granås, B., Kvidal-Røvik, T., Rantala, O., Tervo-Kankare,K., & Maher, P. (2022). Arctic tourism in times of change: Uncertain futures - from overtourism to re-starting tourism. Nordic Council of Ministers. DOI: 10.6027/temanord2022-516 This report presents the findings of the third and final workshop and field course hosted by the project Partnership for Sustainability: Arctic Tourism in Times of Change funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Arctic Co-operation Programme 2018–2021. The focus of the workshop was on overtourism and the impact of and response to COVID-19 by companies and stakeholders in Arctic tourism. This publication was funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25309/delaBarre2022.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Piva, Alyssa;
    Country: Canada

    This research explores the perspectives of faculty members teaching in undergraduate tourism programs across British Columbia (BC), Canada regarding curricula revitalization in consideration of macro changes that have occurred in the tourism industry worldwide including the COVID-19 pandemic, the ongoing climate change crisis, and the urgent need for indigenization. With a focus on programs that offer bachelor’s degrees in tourism management, this qualitative study investigates the perspectives of nine faculty members representing Capilano University, Royal Roads University, Thompson Rivers University, and Vancouver Island University. Data was collected by conducting semi-structured interviews. A reflexive thematic analysis indicated one overarching theme: collaboration; two themes: tourism management higher education must 1) craft leaders who embody 21st century skills and 2) be as dynamic as the tourism industry; and three subthemes: 1) multi-disciplinary, 2) work-integrated learning, and 3) macro changes. Due to the rapid pace of change in the tourism industry, the current curriculum offered in tourism management degree programs across BC must be reimagined. Recommendations include course content revitalization, mandatory work-integrated learning, and the renewal and maintenance of collaboration across institutions. The study’s findings are relevant to tourism management students, faculty members and higher education institutions in British Columbia.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Orleni, Erica;
    Country: Canada

    This paper aims to explore the demand for wellness tourism and how it has grown in the last decade. This growth is in part due to increased stress levels from various factors. Some of these factors are heightened stress in society such as COVID-19 and high inflation, people working longer hours, unhealthy lifestyles, and higher obesity rates. The study focused on the demographic cohort known as millennials, ranging from 25 to 40 years of age. Millennials are projected to account for 75 percent of consumers and travelers by 2025 globally. The study aimed to determine how Destination Marketing Organizations (DMO) can rethink their approaches for targeting millennial consumers and travelers and the preferences of Canadian millennials specifically related to their perceptions and their needs from wellness tourism within Canada. The material presented in the literature review represents the relevance of wellness, wellness in tourism, the importance of wellness in Canada, the impact of COVID-19, and millennials' characteristics and influence on tourism. The study uses a qualitative approach for interviews with DMOs on how to approach their marketing strategies and a mix-method approach on surveys for millennials on how they perceive wellness tourism. The qualitative research assisted in identifying the elements of millennial travel and DMO's influence in marketing to the demographic. Appreciative Inquiry (AI) was the critical component in developing the questions for the interview and survey. The questions focused on AI's four D's: Dream, Destiny, Discovery, and Design. The purpose of AI is to help anticipate if the best-case scenario occurred more frequently within the wellness tourism industry in Canada instead of analyzing problems. The data gathered produced a list of the critical factors pertaining to millennial consumer and travel behavior, the importance of wellness tourism for the millennial demographic, and DMO's marketing techniques to target millennial travelers within Canada. Additionally, the data also produced recommendations for the future of wellness and tourism.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Janzen, Nicholas J.;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a myriad of impacts and consequences for secondary school education resulting in, among other things, decreased student engagement and increased issues related to student mental health. The issues of student engagement and mental health are not borne solely from the pandemic however, and teachers have long been seeking ways to address these issues as our traditional educational paradigms lag behind in their ability to combat these problems. This Process Paper and accompanying Major Project seek to address these issues through the Critical Challenge Question, “How can gamified design increase student engagement to support improvements in mental health in secondary fine arts courses?” Photoshop Gamified is a sample gamified secondary elective course designed to introduce teachers to the principles and practice of gamification in secondary education through a research and evidence-based approach to course design and delivery. This sample gamified course utilizes the Google Suite for Education Learning Management System through the use of Google Sites, Docs, and Classroom and is intended for use in both face-to-face and blended learning environments. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25218/Janzen.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holland, Mark;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In this paper, urban planner, development consultant and educator, Mark Holland, outlines a rethinking of urban structure that will be supercharged as we learn from the impacts of COVID 19 on our cities. The modern city region has been focused on building high density downtowns and peripheral town centres, based on assumptions that are now out of date as a basis for regional planning. COVID 19 closed our downtowns and we now need to reinvent our urban and regional patterns in light of what we have (re)discovered from our pandemic response. Restructuring our economy, social patterns, food systems and regional growth patterns into a network of high-street-based corridors will not only make us more resilient to shocks like COVID 19, but overall create a much healthier, sustainable, and economically viable region. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23638/HollandFP2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Susan L. Prescott; Ganesa Wegienka; Remco Kort; David H. Nelson; Sabine Gabrysch; Trevor Hancock; Anita L. Kozyrskyj; Christopher A. Lowry; Nicole Redvers; Blake Poland; +21 more
    Countries: Australia, Netherlands, United Kingdom

    The “Earthrise” photograph, taken on the 1968 Apollo 8 mission, became one of the most significant images of the 20th Century. It triggered a profound shift in environmental awareness and the potential for human unity—inspiring the first Earth Day in 1970. Taking inspiration from these events 50 years later, we initiated Project Earthrise at our 2020 annual conference of inVIVO Planetary Health. This builds on the emergent concept of planetary health, which provides a shared narrative to integrate rich and diverse approaches from all aspects of society towards shared solutions to global challenges. The acute catastrophe of the COVID-19 pandemic has drawn greater attention to many other interconnected global health, environmental, social, spiritual, and economic problems that have been underappreciated or neglected for decades. This is accelerating opportunities for greater collaborative action, as many groups now focus on the necessity of a “Great Transition”. While ambitious integrative efforts have never been more important, it is imperative to apply these with mutualistic value systems as a compass, as we seek to make wiser choices. Project Earthrise is our contribution to this important process. This underscores the imperative for creative ecological solutions to challenges in all systems, on all scales with advancing global urbanization in the digital age—for personal, environmental, economic and societal health alike. At the same time, our agenda seeks to equally consider our social and spiritual ecology as it does natural ecology. Revisiting the inspiration of “Earthrise”, we welcome diverse perspectives from across all dimensions of the arts and the sciences, to explore novel solutions and new normative values. Building on academic rigor, we seek to place greater value on imagination, kindness and mutualism as we address our greatest challenges, for the health of people, places and planet.

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Canadian Institute of Planners
    Country: Canada

    Canada in 2050: What does the future look like?|Le Canada en 2050 : À quoi ressemble l’avenir? / Glenn Miller & Ray Tomalty -- On a different path towards 2050: Future-proofing cities against climate change / David Miller -- Planning plausible futures / Sarah Krapez, Blair Underhill, & Robert Barrs -- Plan UX: Designing plans and processes for a rapidly changing world / Robert Barrs & Kasia Tota -- Social infrastructure: Increasing quality of life amid an uncertain futures / Dylan Thiessen -- Transforming Vancouver into a water sensitive city by 2020 / Julie McManus & Wendy de Hoog -- Planning education: The next generation / Markus Moos -- Immigrants in suburbs are restructuring the Toronto Region / Mohammad A. Qadeer -- CIP and COVID-19|L'ICU et la COVID-19 / Beth McMahon -- John Merton Wright: 1929-1999 / Nicholas Tunnacliffe Canada in 2050|Le Canada en 2050 Canada in 2050: What does the future look like?|Le Canada en 2050 : À quoi ressemble l’avenir? / Glenn Miller & Ray Tomalty -- On a different path towards 2050: Future-proofing cities against climate change / David Miller -- Planning plausible futures / Sarah Krapez, Blair Underhill, & Robert Barrs -- Plan UX: Designing plans and processes for a rapidly changing world / Robert Barrs & Kasia Tota -- Social infrastructure: Increasing quality of life amid an uncertain futures / Dylan Thiessen -- Transforming Vancouver into a water sensitive city by 2020 / Julie McManus & Wendy de Hoog -- Planning education: The next generation / Markus Moos -- Immigrants in suburbs are restructuring the Toronto Region / Mohammad A. Qadeer -- CIP and COVID-19|L'ICU et la COVID-19 / Beth McMahon -- John Merton Wright: 1929-1999 / Nicholas Tunnacliffe https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25291/PlanCanada_Summer2020.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McCunn, Lindsay J.;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: Canada

    The COVID-19 pandemic has produced an opportunity for urban planners, government decision-makers, health practitioners, and environmental psychologists to further understand human psychosocial wellbeing in cities. Given a growing base of evidence illustrating that interaction with nature positively affects mood and mental health, preserving access to green spaces in cities during this time of mandated social isolation should be considered imperative for as long as possible. This think-piece highlights that parks, community gardens, and other natural areas are essential to urban dwellers, especially if directives to physically distance from one another become longstanding or recurrent. Public decision-makers should aim to develop simple, relatively inexpensive strategies to augment the usability of nature in innovative ways that make it possible to enjoy them while respecting distance guidelines. Also discussed is the notion that a predominant goal for social scientists and urban practitioners during this crisis will be to learn how people view the ways in which public parks and wilder urban areas mitigate their response to worry, isolation, and an altered form of civic engagement. Research on the extent to which ���sense of place��� changes for city dwellers during this global circumstance will be important for planners and social scientists alike. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Cities & Health on July 30, 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23748834.2020.1795385.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    By, Natassja Courtney;
    Country: Canada

    This action research inquiry, undertaken in partnership with the Independent Schools Association of British Columbia (ISABC), was guided by the question: How might the ISABC’s Team Leadership Program support the leadership development and thriving of emerging and middle leaders throughout and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic? Data were collected with a survey and two focus groups involving 52 participants from 16 independent schools. Arts-based approaches included photo elicitation and found poetry. Key findings indicated the pandemic has magnified the human side of educational leadership and thriving as being a middle leader requires communication, relationship building, and the prioritization of followers’ needs. Recommendations addressed strategies to (a) develop self-awareness, coaching, and interpersonal skills amongst emerging leaders; (b) capitalize on existing leadership networks to foster a stronger sense of belonging within the ISABC; and (c) offer leadership-focused professional development and resources accessible to the broader ISABC community. Keywords: arts-based research, found poetry, K–12, independent schools, leadership development, middle leaders, photo elicitation, thriving at work